95

Adding the word "personally" communicates that the speaker recognizes the subjective nature of their preference. It also precludes interpretation of the statement as an effort to persuade the listener. I personally try to avoid using it.


39

You could say these were antithetical to or the antithesis of the correct thing, meaning that whatever the right thing is, what you see is diametrically opposed to that: antithesis n 2. the direct opposite (usually followed by of or to): Her behavior was the very antithesis of cowardly. Source: dictionary.reference.com In your case, you might say ...


37

It's technically redundant, since all opinions are personal, however it can modify the tone of the statement to some degree. It effectively takes emphasis away from the opinion itself by placing the emphasis on the holder of the opinion. For example, suppose I'm in a group of people, and we're trying to decide whether to go to Madame Tussauds or to see a ...


35

Here is a hypothetical conversation where emphasis on did might make sense: Speaker A: "You look sweaty. Were you working out at the gym?" Speaker B: "No, I didn't come from the gym." Speaker A: "Well, where did you come from?" Speaker A wants to elicit an affirmative statement by that emphasis. The emphasis also expresses annoyance at ...


33

You could say "That answer is the "polar opposite" of what I'm looking for!"


27

Myself is a reflexive pronoun. It’s called that because one of its uses is to reflect the action of a verb back onto the subject, as in ‘I’ve hurt myself’. Yourselves is used in the same way in the sentence you quote from ‘Harry Potter’. Reflexive pronouns are also used for emphasis, and that is how myself is being used in ‘I myself don't like this idea’ (...


19

@Jasper suggests that the emphasis indicates surprise at your sudden appearance; but in my experience that would be indicated by stressing the you ("Where did you come from?"). When the did is stressed, especially if said in an arch voice (or textually in a sarcastic context), it would imply that your behavior is weird, incomprehensible, or just odd. In ...


17

backwards '3. in the reverse of usual order or direction1 '2. Done or arranged in a manner or order that is opposite to previous occurrence or normal use.2 The styles used for the Removed and Added permission labels are backwards. 1 Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003 2 ...


16

I notice the following techniques in the Declaration of Independence: Initial Caps Small Caps All Caps Larger Text Size Font Change (script vs something that's more like black lettering) Stylized Swashes White Space Each of which serves to give a sense of emphasis.


14

In this case, it is not the location he came from that is important. It is the very act of appearing from somewhere, and that act is represented by the verb did.


14

I know that. I do know that. Both versions of this sentence are correct. The second is an emphatic version of the sentence. When we want to give a sentence positive emphasis, when we want to emphasise that it's true, we usually stress the auxiliary verb: I can speak French. I will do my homework. I have been to France. In present simple and past ...


13

The New York Times' stylebook says or not is often redundant. It is ordinarily omitted when the clause functions as a noun, e.g. it is the object of a verb or preposition, or subject of the sentence. However, when a whether clause acts as an adverb, or not is needed. Check this NYT blog post for more details. Another test, courtesy of Garner’s Modern ...


13

Eighteenth-century attempts to clarify the source of italics in quotations Google Books searches for various phrases containing italics or emphasis uncover two attempts from the late 1700s to distinguish between italics or other special typographic treatments that appeared in the original version of a quotation and emphatic typography that the quoting author ...


12

It is done to make a clear distinction between the two 'their's in the sentence. The sentence can easily be split into two halves: Some elections are held in friendly client states to legitimize their rulers and regimes and ... others are held in disfavored or enemy countries to legitimize their political systems. In the first half, 'their' ...


10

"Dead wrong" seems like an appropriate modifier to "wrong" to emphasize your point.


10

From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stress_(linguistics)#Prosodic_stress I didn't take the test yesterday. (Somebody else did.) I didn't take the test yesterday. (I did not take it.) I didn't take the test yesterday. (I did something else with it.) I didn't take the test yesterday. (I took a different one.) I didn't take the test yesterday. (I took ...


10

The rosetta stone features cartouches to call out the names of the rulers: This was the ancient Egyptian version of bold-faced names in gossip columns. Champollion was able to use this as a clue in his translation of the hieroglyphics. I don't believe the cartouche was a general purpose emphasis tho.


10

There are loads of ways, but they fit a few categories. (Heck, here's a similar list on Wikipedia) Most of these stand out only if the writer is consistent enough that the change is unexpected as part of the previous pattern. Color: when colors contrast, the eye catches a difference. Red is especially good for standing out. (e.g. Rubrication & Gilding) ...


9

I think that, although the term is overused, it definitely serves a very specific purpose. Your example is: I personally don't like wax museums and I don't like wax museums In this particular situation, by using the word "personally", the individual emphasizes that others might be of another belief. If I ask someone, "Do you like my drawing?", and ...


8

It depends on the context and relationship of the subject and audience. If the person typically or frequently wears the hat or shirt of some organization, and the audience recognizes that association, including the adverb 'personally' helps distinguish the speaker's opinion from the opinion of the organization.


8

So that, as in your first example, means ‘in order that’. Such that means ‘of a kind’, as in ‘The experts we invited were such that diverse opinions could be heard.’


8

Diametrically opposed, where diametric in particular, as per dictionary.com: adjective: of, relating to, or along a diameter. . in direct opposition; being at opposite extremes; complete: diametrical opposites; a diametrical difference.


6

They technically mean the same thing (and both are grammatically correct). There is a difference, but it is subtle. It's more clear in spoken English, or at least easier if you add an emphasis where necessary (which I have done below). It works. Plain and simple, the thing works; no implications here. It actually works. Think of it more as "You ...


6

In non-electronic written English, capitalization is rarely used for emphasis. Much more common is italics or underlining. While underlining was very common in the age of the typewriter, word processing has made italics more accessible (it has long been the preferred technique for emphasis in printed materials). In email and other electronic communication, ...


6

No. The kind of emphasis you are talking about is called verum focus because it emphasizes the truth of the sentence being uttered. In sentences with an auxiliary verb (be, have, or a modal verb like might, can, must, etc.) it is that auxiliary verb that gets focused. The verb do is only used when there is no auxiliary verb in the sentence. This is the ...


6

Because italicizing for emphasis can select any word as well as parts of words, italicizing an article means that you are emphasizing that article for some purpose. Compare: "Is it a orange?" "No, it is an orange." (An emphasized in contrast to "a.") "Is it an apple?" "No, it is an orange." (Orange ...


5

Similarly to tomothymh, I use "whether" alone unless I intend to convey "regardless of whather." In the latter case, I think "whether or not" is generally preferable to "regardless of whether." Thus: Whether I wear a coat depends on the temperature. But: I'm going to wear my new red coat whether or not it's cold.


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