28 votes
Accepted

How to correctly apply "in which", "of which", "at which", "to which", etc?

The trick to knowing how to use; of which, at which, in which, to which, from which is to analyse the prepositional phrases, phrasal verbs, verbs and prepositions: He /spoke of/ war and peace ...
  • 12.6k
24 votes

"...will divide the people (who/whom) most need to be brought together"

Because the subject of who most need is simply who, you have to use With a two-party system, our nation will divide the people who most need to be brought together. If you want a whom example, try ...
  • 131k
20 votes
Accepted

The film [that/which] I selected for viewing

The Original Poster's Question The film that I chose for the class to watch is called The Life of Igor. The film which I chose for the class to watch is called The Life of Igor. Both that ...
11 votes

What’s the rule for using “who” and “whom” correctly?

Who and whom also happen to be relative pronouns. Relative pronouns link noun phrases (NP) to relative clauses (RC). Who is the subject pronoun, and it has its object form whom and possessive form ...
  • 551
10 votes
Accepted

"Who should be ashamed is your wife" is this ungrammatical? Why?

This use of who (as a subject relative pronoun without an antecedent noun phrase) is almost obsolete. It was so used in older English, and survives in a few proverbs and quotations, such as: Who ...
  • 75.4k
10 votes
Accepted

When are relative pronouns omitted in a sentence?

There are four factors which decide whether a relative pronoun (or the word that) can be omitted or not: Is it a defining relative clause? Does the main verb in the relative clause have a separate ...
9 votes

Relative pronouns "where" and "when": where can they be omitted?

Short answer and quick fix: Look at the gap in the relative clause. If the gap can be filled in with the pronoun it, use the relative pronoun which. If the gap can be filled in using the locative ...
9 votes

Is "I am who(m) God made me" grammatical?

It's grammatical. As per my answer at SAH's question, it's grammaticality is flushed out when one adds what has been (or can be taken to have been) elided, so: I am who/m God made me to be. For ...
9 votes
Accepted

Does the word "that" refer to "features" or "windows 9x"?

Both instances of "that" refer back to the specific features alluded to at the beginning of the sentence when it says "a number of features". Microsoft built a number of features into Windows 9x that ...
  • 2,657
9 votes

Is this natural? "There's somebody wants to see you."

This isn’t correct in written English and I believe it’d be considered a mistake here on the West Coast of the United States, although it shouldn’t be a big deal to misspeak one word in a sentence, ...
  • 5,641
8 votes

Why Do English Speakers Use "Preposition + Relative Pronoun" Form?

You are starting from a false premise if you believe that there is a position where the preposition "is supposed to be", particularly if you think that the correct position is "at the end of the ...
  • 31.7k
7 votes

Using the word "whether" instead of "which"

Just as where is the wh-word that goes in front of questions about location, whether is the wh-word that goes in front of yes/no questions when they're subordinated: Is he going (or not)? ~ I wonder ...
7 votes
Accepted

Do I need another 'which' in this sentence?

The second which is optional, but the first which should be a that because it's restricting "possible careers" [Grammarist]. You might want to consider rewriting your sentence as follows, sticking ...
7 votes
Accepted

How can the relative pronoun 'which' have an adjectival phrase as its antecedent? Exactly what may act as antecedent for 'which'?

Relative clauses with which can have a wide variety of phrases as antecedent, despite the fact that which is often described as a relative pronoun: Preposition phrase - They alleged the party was on ...
7 votes
Accepted

How do I choose between ‘who’ or ‘whom’ when the subject pronoun is unclear?

First of all, each of the examples given in the body of your question should be "whom." This is a holdover from when the English language had cases, which you sort of referenced by noting the ...
  • 319
7 votes

Is this natural? "There's somebody wants to see you."

It doesn't look as though anyone has addressed your third question yet, so I'll give it a shot. Omitting the relative pronoun "who" would be unusual in formal speech. (As you can see from ...
6 votes

When to use “that” and when to use “which”, especially in relative clauses

My answer comes so late that it is probably doomed to dwell at the bottom of the answer column, but the question remains a question about which I care, so my answer adds a point other answers have ...
  • 945
6 votes
Accepted

"Which" instead of "whose" for inanimate objects

John Lawler wrote in a comment: The legal pied-piping that your friend points to is restricted to lawyers, and is not the same construction that appears in the ungrammatical sentence you point out: ...
6 votes

How do I choose between ‘who’ or ‘whom’ when the subject pronoun is unclear?

Relative pronouns like who, which, etc. are extracted from some position in the relative clause and moved to the front of the clause. I.e, the car [which she saw ___ in the street] starts with a ...
6 votes
Accepted

Use the object pronoun or the subject pronoun as the relative pronoun heading a restrictive clause that employs a transitive verb and a linking verb?

James is the man who we know ____ is who won it. Here, "who" is not object of "know" but subject of the embedded "is" clause, marked by gap '___' . "Who won it"...
  • 10.7k
5 votes

What’s the rule for using “who” and “whom” correctly?

This is an attempt to also formulate an answer to my own recent question which was marked as a duplicate: How do I choose between ‘who’ or ‘whom’ when the subject pronoun is murky? I am still ...
5 votes

"...programs that each perform..." vs "...programs that each performs...": which is correct?

The real problem with the OP is that “each” has been inserted in a position that obfuscates its purpose. It would be clearer if it said: “ foo [comprises] of multiple binary programs that perform a ...
  • 30.3k
5 votes

"To which", "by which", "on which" etc

Wikipedia contains [blended with previous version]: Relative pronoun as the object of a preposition A relative pronoun often appears as the object of a preposition. For formal writing or ...
5 votes

Can "where" ever be used as the subject of a relative/adjective clause?

Given the examples He went back to Santa Monica, which was his hometown. (The comma is necessary for a non-restrictive relative clause) *He went back to Santa Monica, where was his hometown. (...
5 votes

"Which" instead of "whose" for inanimate objects

I'm living in a country which language I have been learning for less than 5 months. The preceding sentence is certainly ungrammatical. Your proposed correction is right: I'm living in a country ...
  • 75.8k
5 votes

Relative pronouns "where" and "when": where can they be omitted?

You can omit the relative word only if it's possible to use "that" to introduce the relative clause I think "I met Laura on the day I missed the train to Barcelona" should ...
  • 75.8k
5 votes

Is "I am who(m) God made me" grammatical?

The reason is that traditionally, you can't use who in fused relative clauses; that is, you cannot use who when it figures in two clauses, being the subject (object) of one and the subject (object) of ...
5 votes

Is this natural? "There's somebody wants to see you."

According to this reference "who" should not be omitted in this sentence. (PristineWord) Look at this sentence. Correct The waiter who served us yesterday was rude. The subject of the ...
  • 14.8k
4 votes

"Who should be ashamed is your wife" is this ungrammatical? Why?

You are right. Who does not work as the subject of a verb unless it is interrogative. One can ask Who should be ashamed? Or who can be a relative pronoun, as in The person who should be ashamed is... ...
  • 63.8k
4 votes

The film [that/which] I selected for viewing

Opinions vary considerably on this one. That and which are the same In this Language Log blog (dated 2004), the author calls the distinction between the two nonsense: ...the old nonsense about which ...
  • 16.1k

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