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11 votes
Accepted

What is "it" in the following sentence: It is clear that Bob likes doughnuts

The it in both example sentences is, as noted, a "dummy it" -- that is, this it is not referential, and thus doesn't have any meaning, because meaning in pronouns is a matter of reference ...
John Lawler's user avatar
9 votes
Accepted

Does the word "that" refer to "features" or "windows 9x"?

Both instances of "that" refer back to the specific features alluded to at the beginning of the sentence when it says "a number of features". Microsoft built a number of features into Windows 9x that ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 2,680
7 votes
Accepted

How can the relative pronoun 'which' have an adjectival phrase as its antecedent? Exactly what may act as antecedent for 'which'?

Relative clauses with which can have a wide variety of phrases as antecedent, despite the fact that which is often described as a relative pronoun: Preposition phrase - They alleged the party was on ...
Araucaria - Him's user avatar
4 votes

Should an antecedent of "everyone" take "their" or "his" or "our" as its corresponding possessive pronoun?

Your test is unfair, because there is no single answer that everyone would agree upon. Everybody, along with everyone, traditionally uses a singular pronoun of reference: everybody must sign his ...
michael.hor257k's user avatar
3 votes

Does the word "that" refer to "features" or "windows 9x"?

Let's address this in a very simple manner. Remove into Windows 9x from the sentence. Let us withhold the subject (Windows 9x in this case) for a moment. Does the sentence still make sense? Does the ...
Noaman Ali's user avatar
3 votes

keep it inside your body, where it belongs [antecedent of 'where']

Yes, so if you want to keep it inside your body, where it belongs, you should stop jumping off trucks doing eighty on the interstate! If you split the relative clause into a separate sentence, it ...
herisson's user avatar
  • 82.4k
3 votes
Accepted

Don't be trapped by dogma, which is living with the results of other people's thinking

Supplementary relatives allow wide range of antecedents, including clauses. (CaGEL p1035): Pat is afraid of snakes, which doesn’t surprise me at all The antecedent of the relativised element in ...
DW256's user avatar
  • 9,090
3 votes

Opposite of Extinction

While extant is (roughly) the opposite of extinct (the state of [still] existing vs. the state of not existing), I would contend that there isn't an analogous opposite to extinction: extinction [TFD] ...
TripeHound's user avatar
  • 3,405
3 votes

I want to lnow what is the antecedent of the pronoun “it” in the following context?

The "it" referred to is the existence of ripples in the fabric of space, or (equivalently) the idea of such ripples. Note that this is a common device in media: discuss an idea in original prose, ...
not all wrong's user avatar
3 votes

"There is a picture of myself on the wall." Can a reflexive pronoun be used without an antecedent like this?

There are many uses for the word myself, and to treat it as only a reflexive pronoun is too prescriptive — so prescriptive, in fact, that it would be wrong. The use you give is indeed accepted as ...
ktm5124's user avatar
  • 2,828
2 votes

How can the relative pronoun 'which' have an adjectival phrase as its antecedent? Exactly what may act as antecedent for 'which'?

Most grammars define a relative pronoun as something like this: A relative pronoun is used to link a so-called relative clause to the head of a noun phrase or, in some cases, to a whole clause. ...
KarlG's user avatar
  • 28.2k
2 votes

"one of the cables that runs" or "one of the cables that run"?

When 'One of' is the subject of a statement/clause, it should be followed by a determiner and a plural noun and the verb should agree with the subject in number, i.e singular. E.g: One of my friends ...
mahmud k pukayoor's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

"one of the cables that runs" or "one of the cables that run"?

Hmm. I have just reversed myself on this, to the extent that I have removed my comment disagreeing with Chris M's answer. Logically, it should be "run", unless it means that only one of the cables ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 77.2k
2 votes

Singular or plural when there is no plural antecedent?

Here's your quote: Each month, the school holds a party. This event is / These events are/ successful because it attracts / they attract over two hundred students. The issue is to determine what ...
Lawrence's user avatar
  • 38.7k
2 votes
Accepted

Are these two 'that's relative pronouns? If then, what is the antecedent of each of them?

Yes, those are two relative pronouns. The move is the antecedent of both thats. The main clause: Was there some move? relative clause 1: the move is beyond what was being presented to me ...
William's user avatar
  • 1,728
2 votes
Accepted

Do we need to explicitly mention the antecedent in an attributive clause inside another one, both describing the same antecedent?

In each of those two examples, the second subsidiary clause is ungrammatical, even without the first subsidiary clause. In your sentence 1., one problem is the explicit "they" -- this should not be ...
Rosie F's user avatar
  • 5,292
2 votes

You'll know afterwards, when I get mad. [Analysis of 'when']

Donna: Well, you'll know afterwards, when I get mad. Is when a relative word taking afterwards as antecedent? When, adverb = the time at which This is spoken “Well, you'll know afterwards, [slight ...
Greybeard's user avatar
  • 42.5k
2 votes

Can I mix up plural with singular to resolve pronoun ambiguity?

Technically, this is a dangling modifier. It has nothing to do with plural or singular. Dangling modifiers feel awkward because they do not attach to anything. Most people will understand you, but ...
Diary of a Speedreader's user avatar
2 votes

What is the right way to avoid antecedent ambiguity?

I would recommend your proposed third alternative, punctuated as follows. In his early days he worked in three other films by Quentin Tarantino. This is a substantial improvement to the sentence, ...
TechnoCat's user avatar
  • 641
2 votes

What is the right way to avoid antecedent ambiguity?

The ambiguity comes from antecedent-matching. Both “He” and “Quentin Tarantino” qualify as the antecedent to “his”. Proximity tends to push first impressions away from your intended “He-his” match. ...
Lawrence's user avatar
  • 38.7k
2 votes
Accepted

Is the pronoun 'it' used correctly in this sentence?

The pronoun it in the sentence A controlling idea: What the writer is going to focus on it in the paragraph. is unnecessary and ungrammatical. Such pronouns, which are usually but not always in a ...
Shoe's user avatar
  • 33.1k
2 votes

When ‘that’ follows an 𝒳-of-𝒴 subject, which noun phrase does ‘that’ refer to: the first noun phrase 𝒳 or the second noun phrase 𝒴?

Like most questions we get here, the question as asked is based on a number of misconceptions. As pointed out in comments, but since comments are to be hidden, we hafta start over with formal Answers. ...
John Lawler's user avatar
2 votes

Pronoun Reference usage

Your example is perfectly correct, and if you ask me, I would recommend using that than the alternative. Grammar.com is very clear about this: When you use a pronoun, it will typically refer to a ...
fev's user avatar
  • 34.2k
1 vote

keep it inside your body, where it belongs [antecedent of 'where']

I believe you can remove the comma and still keep the sentence grammatically correct. However I'm not sure if that would make it a restrictive relative clause, as where it belongs doesn't give us any ...
Zandwhich's user avatar
1 vote

Identifying the antecedent of an integrated(restrictive) relative clause

Page 412 of CGEL has diagrams of "few of her friends" and "someone I know": I don't know exactly how to interpret the meaning of [7a] and [7b], but I assume the same kind of diagram would be given ...
1 vote

I've found <somewhere/some place/a place> where

Specimens a, c, and d are correct. Specimen d is the most natural. If you omit where (as in specimen b), somewhere ceases to function as a noun (meaning some unspecified place) and instead functions ...
Tinfoil Hat's user avatar
  • 17.5k
1 vote

What is the antecedent in this passage?

The subject of was is meaning. It refers to the entire language before so, as @BillJ says in his comment. As you can tell from comments, the punctuation is poor. It would have been better as two ...
Xanne's user avatar
  • 15.1k
1 vote

What is the antecedent in this passage?

I am distilling down the verbiage in each example, and actually rephrasing things a bit in the second in order to get it to express its essential meaning in a shorter fashion. 1. It. Just as ...
Jason Bassford's user avatar
1 vote

Can a plural noun be followed by “due to it”?

Neither smoking nor your health can possibly be thought to be described as containing toxic chemicals. A verb can't contain a noun, nor can the type of noun that health belongs to. In the example ...
Jason Bassford's user avatar
1 vote

Relative clause after a possessive

The context is: She never tired of listening to people even if it demanded endless patience from her. There were times when the rest of the people in the courtroom would begin to get fidgety, but not ...
JK2's user avatar
  • 6,573

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