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Is “whose” a true relative pronoun? (and request for the full list of relative pronouns)

A pronoun is a word that substitutes for or refers to a noun that is already understood based on the context in a discourse. Right. We use whose in place of a possessive noun, e.g. John's, so it's a ...
Mori's user avatar
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What’s going on with John 7:16, “My teaching is not my own, but his who sent me”?

Theodore Roosevelt [Good Reads] used this string: The joy of living is his who has the heart to demand it. As did Ralph Waldo Emerson [One Journey]: The world is his who can see through its ...
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar
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What’s going on with John 7:16, “My teaching is not my own, but his who sent me”?

It's comparable to It's not my book, it's his. But that assumes the listener knows who "his" refers to. In a face-to-face conversation you could point at him to make it clear. But in the ...
Barmar's user avatar
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More confusion with relative pronoun ambiguity

It is ambiguous. Notwithstanding the grammatical explanations of those who appear to have extensively studied the theory and terminology, the inclusion of colloquialisms such as "...compared to, ...
rikkiinandalucia's user avatar
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A relative pronoun acting as both object and subject?

The relativiser “that” has been omitted in both examples – this is quite usual. Wikipedia explains “relativser” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relativizer In linguistics, a relativizer (abbreviated ...
Greybeard's user avatar
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