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I would like to use the archaic expression (from the family of hence, whereby etc.) to refine the sentence:

"..the weights introduced in Exercise 2 and determined from it/from there"

meaning the weights were presented and their utility described with Exercise 2 during which their optimal values were selected.

My instinct would point towards whence , used as in

".. in Exercise 2 and determined whence."

but I'm not too sure whether the meaning (Merriam Webster: from what place, source, or cause) can be bent to what I'm thinking or if the word can even be used this way at all (at the end of a sentence).

Any insights would be greatly appreciated,

thank you all.

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    How about thereby (adv): By that, from that.
    – emsoff
    Apr 15, 2014 at 23:21
  • “The weights […] determined from then/there” does not make any kind of sense to me to begin with. Are you simply trying to say, “The weights introduced and determined in Exercise 2”? Apr 15, 2014 at 23:21
  • I'm curious why you would want to use a word so archaic that you can't decide between whence/thence/etc. Apr 15, 2014 at 23:22
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    My question here is then: what are you trying to say? The example you give is not English. It makes no sense. We cannot tell you which word you should use in an example that we do not understand the meaning of. Weights are not usually ‘determined’ at all, and certainly not from anything. It doesn’t matter which of the words mentioned so far you put in, the sentence still doesn’t make sense. Apr 15, 2014 at 23:34
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    Suddenly I wish there were an Archaic English Language Learners.
    – MetaEd
    Apr 17, 2014 at 0:24

3 Answers 3

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Are you thinking of "thence" as your mystery word? Or thereby

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  • thereby! EXACTLY. "Thence" I would say is pretty much the same as whence although it would indeed sound better in this case given the "from there" rather than "from where" connotation. Apr 15, 2014 at 23:28
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Alternatively:

"..the weights introduced in Exercise 2 and determined thusly.

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The word you are thinking of, funnily enough, is therefrom:

from that or it

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