Questions tagged [technical]

Questions related to the use of technical language.

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22 views

Writing a vision statement: Correct usage?

Often times, my hard-core nerdiness gets in the way of my language skills. I am a native (American) English speaker who lacks the understanding of the nuances of the language. I am writing a vision ...
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14 views

Does marketing have a technical term for “positive spin” or “euphemism”?

I am trying to research the phenomenon where a "double-edged sword" type of issue gets sold using only its positive, sunny side (even where its negative side is much more significant or is even the ...
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57 views

Unclear usage of 'download something.'

Recently I saw the term 'Download data' on a user interface button. The meaning was 'Start transferring data to an underlying system' or more specific 'Note the underlying system that it can start ...
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2answers
70 views

Which is the correct form of a verb with two subjects? [closed]

In order to replace timing belt two hoses and holding bracket need to be removed. Or: In order to replace timing belt two hoses and holding bracket needs to be removed.
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1answer
76 views

Does “angular cheilitis” have any more commonly used synonyms than “perlèche” or “rhagades” which regular people would recognize?

The field of medical pathology uses the term angular cheilitis. I’m looking for a common word or phrase to use in place of this highly specialized technical term that I fear is likely to be known only ...
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9 views

Asymmetric Encryption - How is the Public Key Being Shared? [migrated]

Good Afternoon, I've been reading up on the relationship between private keys and public keys (as well as hashing), watched a few videos, but I am still a bit confused. I don't have a programming ...
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2answers
107 views

What does “playground” mean in an informatics educational context?

What does “playground” mean when people use this word in articles or tutorials? For example, there is an article with this title: "Kotlin Playground" (Kotlin is a programming language and this is an ...
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1answer
45 views

Meaning of the verb “to vendor”

Several technical articles write about vendor using it as a verb: https://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0518/#configparser quoth: While one could standardize on what Python 3 accepts and simply ...
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1answer
33 views

In/on prepositions when referring to a front or back-end (computing)

When writing about computing, should I refer to a component in the front-end or on the front-end? For example: It was decided to place the function in the front-end Or should it be It was ...
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1answer
30 views

How to write when you're comparing dates [closed]

I want to express in a technical specification document the outcome when comparing two dates. In programming language I can simply say if DateA is smaller than DateB but when translating this to ...
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1answer
38 views

What does 'housing dedicated' mean in context of microprocessors?

So, recently I came across an article, which reads: With the newer FPGAs housing dedicated processors, it is worth exploring how applications currently implemented solely on ECUs can be ...
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1answer
25 views

How to technical write, “…is the first of its kind” [closed]

How can I write the following in technical terms "Hence, to the best our knowledge, the analysis provided in the following sections for .... by an ABC-node is the first of its kind."
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2answers
93 views

How to write numbers concerning physical quantities?

Is there a rule specifying how one should separate thousands in numbers? Should I put a comma in this phrase, “500–1500 ohms”, so it would become “500–1,500 ohms”? If so why?
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3answers
62 views

What is the metal box the dishwasher parts are in called? Dishwasher housing/body/case?

I'm translating a technical text and can't decide about wording. How do you call a metal box the dishwasher parts are in? The variants are "housing"/"body"/"case"/"frame". Not the "cabinet" - I don't ...
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1answer
104 views

Meaning of the term “instaciate”/“instatiate” in computer programming

What does this word mean? instaciate, otherwise instatiate It's not in any of my dictionaries, but there are a few too many occurrences of this word in programming communities and across the ...
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1answer
365 views

What is the space in between flights of stairs where you can see all the way down called?

The space between flights of stairs that is kinda like a tunnel of sorts. Or a shaft. Does it have a name? It needs a name. Maybe this should be posted on a architecture page.
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2answers
46 views

What is the term for a safety feature that prevents operation in unsafe conditions?

I'm thinking about things like the switches in a rice cooker that won't let you turn them on without actually adding rice and water to the pot, or a handle bar on a lawn mower that turns the engine ...
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1answer
31 views

Word Request. Object with saddle shaped stress

I'm looking for a word to describe the type of hand-cuff straps used in, for example Avatar the film. They begin as a straight strip with a curve like a tape-measure, then when you "crack" them they ...
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1answer
39 views

Digits (location/position) vs. digits (glyph/symbol/value) on a display?

This is about (numerical) displays, eg. a "multiple-digit" display such as a https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven-segment_display (LED or LCD) and the difference between a digit as a single-glyph ...
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2answers
123 views

A technical term for constrained motion resembling that of a snake

Imagine a point moving along a curve. This point is simply traversing the curve, I suppose. But now imagine a little "curve-segment" moving along the same curve, while conforming to the curve at all ...
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3answers
325 views

Term describing the smallest possible unit of data

I want to write something like: In cases where the smallest unit of data is available (e.g. houses, persons, vehicles), we can use more detailed models. So I am looking for something describing ...
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4answers
86 views

A more technical term for a “slicing” motion

I seek a word (verb, noun, adverb or adjective) that is suggestive of a particular type of constrained mechanical motion described below by way of example. It could be a flat planar sheet moving ...
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6answers
446 views

Name for the phenomenon where only the top few priority levels are used

I work as a software developer, and we have a ticketing system. Tickets can have "priority levels", with labels like "Critical", "Highest", "High", "Medium", "Low" and similar. It is my experience ...
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1answer
46 views

Capitalizing lowercase names in technical writing (programming) [duplicate]

In a world of programming, there are number of tools which have purposefully lowercase names: like tmux or sed. When talking about this tools, how does capitalization work? Do I never capitalize ...
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3answers
413 views

Word for: A river than splits into two, later rejoining into one? (fluvial terminology)

A tributary is river or stream that flows into a larger river. A distributary a stream branching off a river. Is there a word that combines both structures, the idea of a river that splits in two ...
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2answers
461 views

A term used to watch how someone performs a task? [closed]

A term used to watch how someone performs a task ?
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2answers
99 views

Correct usage of “rated” and “specified”?

When writing about technical subjects, how do we use the adjectives rated and specified correctly? As an example, suppose I am writing about a rechargeable battery, and I would like to express that ...
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1answer
63 views

Is there a name for the areas on a web page where clicks do nothing?

Sometimes I just want to click on a web page to give focus to that browser tab, and it can be hard in some richly functional web pages to find a bit of "blank space" to click on, where clicking won't ...
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3answers
224 views

Terminating punctuation in table entries [closed]

I always get a little flustered by the question of how to punctuate the end of each of my table entries, where the table is part of a longer document primarily composed of traditional sentences but ...
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1answer
88 views

Can't remember the tech name of the opening scene of a game

For example, when you play the game deadmaze, the first thing that shows up is a window filled with the login boxes, along with a background painting and other stuff. Does that generally have a ...
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2answers
276 views

What's the alphabetical counterpart of the word “digit”? [closed]

Characters: Numbers = 0123456789 Letters = ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ Characters: Digits = 0123456789 _________ = ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ Characters: Numerical = 0123456789 Alphabetical = ...
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1answer
75 views

Umbrella term for word types

So, when we analyze language (spoken or written), we tend to classify words according to their syntactic roles or functions (right?): nouns, pronouns, verbs, adverbs, adjectives, conjunctions, and so ...
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5answers
204 views

Origin of the culinary use of “fabricate”

I recently learned that the preferred term in the meat industry for breaking down an animal body into consumer cuts is "fabricate". This is at odds with the common use of the word, which is a synonym ...
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1answer
133 views

How do I write a variable as an ordinal number?

I'm charged with translating a technical document into English, and ran into a bit of an odd problem: the document refers to undefined numbers of elements, and uses letters to represent those numbers, ...
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2answers
79 views

Word which refers to a Position and Timestamp pair [duplicate]

I'm trying to find a term that refers to both a position and a timestamp associated with that position. "Position in time" is a common phrase. Are there more technical terms? A position and timestamp ...
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2answers
81 views

reverse / inverse bionics?

Bionics is the application of principles found in nature to design engineering systems. Which (new) term would be better if we wanted to borrow some principles from technology and apply them in ...
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1answer
117 views

To measure quantitatively

I know that the expression "to measure something quantitatively" is commonly used, especially in contexts that refer to things that are not conventionally quantifiable. For example, when discussing ...
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0answers
61 views

Use of the word “petrol” as a solvent in British English?

In the clip below from YouTube, the narrator refers to the can of liquid solvent shown below as "petrol": However, this container looks like the type we use in America to store what is commonly known ...
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26 views

Deterministic Simple Subset of English

Is there a very restricted subset of English language that is more or less deterministic, captures most of the thoughts that can be expressed by humans and thus solves most of the communication issues ...
12
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1answer
859 views

What is the antonym of “veering” in the nautical sense?

I learned that in nautical English, as used in weather forecasts* transmitted by maritime radio services, if the wind is indicated veering, this has the meaning the direction where it comes from will ...
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111 views

Is it okay to say 'margin of survival'?

I read a sentence 'Most animals lived very close to the margin of survival.' And the writer wanted to say: 'Most animals lived in conditions that were hard to survive.' I wonder whether his ...
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1answer
74 views

“Cislunar” for arbitrary planetary systems?

It appears the term cislunar specifically refers to the space between Earth and the Moon's orbit. Is there a generic term to describe the space between any planet and the orbits of its natural ...
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1answer
250 views

Is “epidemiology” an appropriate word for the study of invasive species in an ecosystem?

I'm looking for a technical term to describe the study of infestations of invasive species. It seems that "epidemiology" is defined (by WHO) as the study of the distribution and determinants of ...
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3answers
868 views

Should I use 'meet' or 'meet with'? [closed]

I'm not sure whether I should use 'meet' or 'meet with': if a Python implementation meets our performance requirements, then... if a Python implementation meets with our performance ...
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2answers
38 views

Engineering term for the “coherence between drawings, products and BOM(Bill of materials)?”

As the title says, is there any engineering term meaning 'coherence(or consistency) between technical drawings, products and BOM(Bill of Materials)?' This concept is used in manufacturing to say that ...
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2answers
729 views

“at which…”, “which… at” and just “… at” in technical writing

I would like to describe a speedometer. Here are 3 ways I can phrase the sentence: The dial shows the speed at which the car is moving. The dial shows the speed which the car is moving at. ...
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2answers
1k views

What does 'against' mean in the phrase 'Execute against a MySQL database'?

I've encountered this strange and rather odd (to me) usage of the preposition 'against', which I quite can't grasp as of now. I've tried to look it up in several dictionaries to no avail.
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2answers
5k views

Is there a proper term for the 'arms' of a star?

I have the need to describe, in a technical document, the particular portion of a star here highlighted red (or any of the other like areas): For example: The width of each …? shall be eight units ...
2
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2answers
104 views

Is there a technical term for a humorous word or phrase?

Is there a technical term for a humorous word or phrase? There are some humorous words or phrases in English. For example: "His ample girth" for "His big stomach" "Her brood" for "Her young ...
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1answer
2k views

The verbs meaning “taking money out of your bank card/adding money to your bank card”

As far as I understand, the technically correct terms for adding money to your account and taking money out of it are "credit" and "debit", respectively. Yet, I am not sure how to correctly use these ...