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According to the Advanced Oxford Learner's Dictionary, an innuendo is "an indirect remark about somebody or something, usually suggesting something bad, mean or rude; the use of remarks like this: innuendoes about her private life or The song is full of sexual innuendo." The word is often used to ...

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“The cat that got the cream” - is there any innuendo?

I think this is a British idiom. The American version would be, "The cat that killed the canary." I was about to say this to a female friend, intended as a "well done" sort of compliment, ...
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Is there a hidden meaning to the name “Coraline Cake” from the suffragette cook book?

According to NPR, the suffragette movement included politically subversive recipe books. Chicago obstetrician and gynecologist Alice Bunker Stockham, the fifth woman to become a licensed doctor in ...
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How to use “innuendo” in a sentence

The word "Innuendo" is rarely used in articles and books. It is usually just found in informal conversations. I was wondering which phrasing seems correct, as well as which may be the best wording. 1....
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Connotation of “unzipping”

I'm working a piece of software that, as part of what it does, will extract/uncompress a ZIP file. I'd like to report this to the user by showing the word "unzipping" alone. Will displaying the word "...
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How would you apply the idiom “I'm $verb'ed out” to “eat”?

I've often heard people apply the suffix -ed after a verb to create phrase, "I'm $verb'ed out." They do this to mean that they've already done $verb, and don't intend to do it in the immediate future ...