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I want to state in an email to a colleague:

I am going to speak with the customer and want to be as informed as possible regarding the frequency at which we have been receiving checks.

Is this the best way to construct this sentence? I'm especially struggling with how the preposition function in this sentence (should I use of or at?).

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    I would reword it like so: I am going to speak with the customer and want to be as informed as possible; please provide me with their record of payments (for the past six months). This should give you the dates and amounts.
    – Davo
    Commented Feb 8, 2017 at 14:38

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Something happens at a particular frequency, so it's at which. It's a frequency of doing something. Technically, I suppose it's frequency of <noun phrase> and frequency at which <verb phrase>. A gerund functions as a noun phrase.

The frequency at which we have been receiving checks
The frequency of our receiving checks

But here, you may not need it at all. Frequency is a technical word. If you do need that implication of precision, fine; but if all you are asking is how often something happens, just use that:

how often we have been receiving checks

If you actually need hard data, you'll need to request that explicitly, as Davo has commented.

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