4

I'm struggling to understand if the sentence below is correct:

The first time they ventured in this bookshop, thus to find refuge and protection from the rain lashing on cobblestones outside, Paul immediately fell in love with the place, as for John, he didn't want to leave it anymore.

Is it possible for "thus to" to replace "in order to"? I'm never sure about the correct usage of "thus"... Also, is it possible to start a sentence with "thus"?

Thank you.

6
  • 2
    Where is this sentence from, please, Louisa? There is an unacceptable comma splice. // 'Thus to find' here means 'in so doing finding' and introduces a consequence, not a reason. It is incongruous, and while arguably not ungrammatical, is in a style I would avoid. // Even adjusting 'anymore' to 'any more' (I'm a Brit and the solid form is an Americanism) doesn't make it appear nearly as elegant as 'As for John ... he didn't want ever to leave'. yesterday
  • Hello Edwin! The sentence is coming from a short novel that a friend of mine is working on. I'm trying to help her in doing so. I understand that the use of "thus" isn't correct here. Therefore, I've change the phrase for: "The first time they ventured into this bookshop, seeking refuge from the rain lashing down on the cobblestones outside, Paul immediately fell in love with the place. As for John... he didn't want ever to leave it." Does it sound less awkward? Thank you!
    – Louisa
    yesterday
  • ............. Yes. yesterday
  • I think the "thus to find ... outside" can be treated as a parenthetical. The comma splice would appear to be the use of a comma rather than a semicolon or period after "with the place".
    – chepner
    yesterday
  • 1
    What "in order to" can actually be replaced with, in most cases, is just "to".
    – Marthaª
    yesterday
9

No, it can't necessarily replace it. Sometimes both will fit, but they do not mean the same thing.

Thus can usually be replaced by in this way.

In your example, thus reads oddly, but it is possible. I would read it as a comment from the narrator, "In this way they found refuge", rather than a representation of the characters' intentions.

You certainly can start a sentence with Thus — again, meaning the same as "In this way".

Thus is quite a formal word, not common in speech.

4
  • Thank you for your clarifications and help Andy, and I am sorry that my question wasn't well explained.
    – Louisa
    2 days ago
  • @Louisa, the question was fine: Andy was replying to my answer.
    – Colin Fine
    yesterday
  • I have edited my answer, @AndyBonner
    – Colin Fine
    yesterday
  • Oh, sorry!! And by the way, thank you for your help!
    – Louisa
    yesterday
2

No, that isn't correct. Your sentence would be better without it. (And we normally "venture into" somewhere.) So "...they ventured into this bookshop to find refuge..."

Thus can mean As a result or consequence of this; therefore or in this way. (Lexico) You could say, "I walked into a tree, thus breaking my nose."

Yes, you can start a sentence with it: "I walked into the tree, broke my nose and was taken to hospital. Thus ended my holiday."

(Btw, you need a full stop after "in love with the place.")

3
  • Thank you for your help. Therefore, it would be better to use "in order to" in this sentence? Would it be correct to separate it in two, like this: "The first time they ventured into this bookshop, in order to find refuge and protection from the rain lashing on cobblestones outside, Paul immediately fell in love with the place. As for John, he didn't want to leave it anymore."
    – Louisa
    2 days ago
  • You're welcome! Yes! "In order to" would be much better. Actually this would be even better: "The first time they ventured into this bookshop, seeking refuge from the rain lashing (down) on the cobblestones outside, Paul immediately fell in love with the place. As for John, he didn't want to leave it anymore." In the UK we usually say 'lashing down'. Maybe they don't where you are. And you need 'the' before 'cobblestones'. "In order to find refuge and protection" is a bit wordy, and refuge implies protection anyway. 2 days ago
  • 1
    I see! It makes much more sense. The sentence is less wordy, indeed. I should have use "down" and "the" before "cobblestones" – my bad, I didn't notice the mistakes... Again, thank you for your help!!
    – Louisa
    2 days ago
0

Here are some examples for thus to: https://lengusa.com/sentence-examples/thus%20to

1
  • 2
    While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. - From Review
    – jimm101
    13 hours ago

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.