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Is there any other way of saying the following sentence, specifically the area of text marked in bold without altering its original meaning?

I've spent my last dollars buying useless medicine...

  • This sounds like a test question from an exam of some sort. Otherwise, please give more context & explanation. You may also find that English Language Learners at ell.stackexchange.com is more suitable to your needs. – TrevorD May 6 '16 at 13:02
  • Thanks! I'm currently developing a video game but my knowledge is quite limited so I can only use simple words and phrases to translate the game content from my main language to English. What I want to achieve exactly is to put emphasis on the lack of money of the character (who speaks this line of dialogue), but I don't know any possible alternatives. Google gives almost no result. – user98194 May 6 '16 at 13:11
  • Is it specific to money or supposed to work with everything? – vickyace May 6 '16 at 13:13
  • Are you looking for idiomatic ways of saying someone has no money? – Spagirl May 6 '16 at 13:20
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    If you want to market it in countries that do not use the dollar, you should avoid any usage of the name of a specific currency. – TrevorD May 6 '16 at 13:55
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Consider tapped out

out of money : broke

The term can also mean

spent, exhausted: tapped out after months on the road

Merriam-Webster

  • I think this is the perfect word for it. Thanks! (ugh can't upvote the answer though, I don't have 15 reps yet...) – user98194 May 6 '16 at 15:01
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Have you considered the verb to waste?

http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/waste

  • I did, but it would be better if it can be said in idiomatic ways (as @Spagirl suggested). :) – user98194 May 6 '16 at 13:35
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If you are in the UK, you could use 'skint'

adjective, British Slang.

1 - having no money; penniless.

www.dictionary.com


Thus "I am skint from buying useless medicine."

If you wanted to get really idiomatic (and still in the UK) you could used the word 'boracic' in place of 'skint'. 'Boracic' is a contraction of the Cockney Rhyming Slang term 'Boracic Lint'

Boracic Lint is Cockney slang for Skint (broke).

"Can't come out tonight, I'm Boracic!"

www.cockneyrhymingslang.co.uk


Thus "I am Boracic from buying useless medicines"

  • 'Boracic' in this usage is usually spelt 'Brassic' . – Spagirl May 6 '16 at 14:04
  • @Spagirl Assuming you are serious (?) I disagree, the word is "Boracic" - 'brassic' is merely the phonetic spelling of the Estuary English pronunciation of the word :) – Marv Mills May 6 '16 at 14:06
  • Yes I am serious. 'Brassic' is a corruption or contraction of 'Boracic', undoubtedly based on pronunciation. It is also undoubtedly slang, but in my experience it is the written form you will find most often for this usage. oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/brassic – Spagirl May 6 '16 at 14:20
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    Ugh... It is the end of days ;) – Marv Mills May 6 '16 at 14:27
  • It took me a long time to find out that the 'brassic' I read in novels was connected to the 'skint' that I also read and that there was a more formal spelling. – Spagirl May 6 '16 at 14:45
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Tou use something up means to exhaust of strength or useful properties properties or finish or burn up a supply of something.

See another definition of use up from Merriam Webster.

  • That's definitely a choice. I'll look it up. Thanks! – user98194 May 6 '16 at 15:03
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I think Impoverished could work

Def. -> exhaust the strength, vitality, or natural fertility of.

  His heart is being impoverished by annual disappointments
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    Impoverish is transitive: you impoverish someone, you don't simply impoverish. You could perhaps say "grows weaker/poorer". – frank May 6 '16 at 14:39
  • Didn't your teacher tell you that Wikipedia and Wikionary are not reliable authorities? – frank May 6 '16 at 15:08

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