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I feel like the word 'people' has become more and more trite from being over used unprofessionally, and doesn't really deliver its intended meaning.

For instance:

"I often find it necessary to assert to people the fact that English has just become a second language for her."

There are no suitable synonyms for it either -- I've checked everywhere.

Is there any way to rewrite the sentence above? Any suggestions on an alternative would be appreciated.

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    I know these are two words that you have clearly considered, but "everyone" and "others" would often be a valid substitute, along with omitting the noun altogether. – undercat Jun 29 '17 at 2:36
  • Ignoring the additional problems with that sentence, the use of "people" there is largely superfluous anyway: who else are you likely to be asserting things to, your dog? Something like "I often find it necessary to mention that English has become a second language for her" might be more palatable, although I'm really not sure what you're intending to say with "a second language". – Hellion Jun 29 '17 at 2:38
  • @Hellion The sentence will be used in an email to my teacher. I can't cut out 'people', because if I do, it'll sound like the verb refers to him. That's why I'm looking for a better substitute... – Bardia Naghsh Jun 29 '17 at 2:47
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    To whom do you often assert this? Other students? Denizens of the internet? Your family? Random people you meet on the street? Why not specify who those people are? – Roger Sinasohn Jun 29 '17 at 3:01
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Just drop the word completely. "I often find it necessary to assert the fact that English has become a second language for her."

Alternatively, you can be more specific. "I often find it necessary to assert to her friends and family that English has become a second language for her."

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    Exactly. Most native English speaker assume all the presuppositions and leave their markers out of sentences. If one asserts, then obviously one asserts to people, not to frogs or matrices. And other people know that, and don't need to be told. You might as well leave out the fact, too, since it does nothing but claim that you're not lying. – John Lawler Jun 29 '17 at 14:32
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    @JohnLawler, I totally agree. Ideally, I would say "I often find it necessary to assert that English has become her second language." However, I wanted to narrowly answer OP's question. – Devil07 Jun 29 '17 at 16:18

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