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First of all, I tried to find an answer to my question under similar topics but couldn't find. If there's a question topic that's identical or similar to this one please put a link and I'll delete this.

We use "on" when we talk about blocking someone on social media e.g. to block on Instagram, to block on WhatsApp, etc.

Where to put "on" when we describe the person/people with relative clauses?

  1. Blocking people who told you were wrong on Linkedin doesn't help you to learn.
  2. Blocking people on Linkedin who told you were wrong doesn't help you to learn.

The first sentence above looks more correct but strange to me. Because I don't mean the people who told somebody that he/she was wrong "on Linkedin" (i.e. telling this on a linkedin page or under a post comment or something like that: "you were wrong on Linkedin").

The second sentence looks totally different to me: It looks like I described "Linkedin" as a person who told somebody that he/she was wrong.

As a third option, I'm thinking about using comma:

  1. Blocking people who told you were wrong, on Linkedin doesn't help you to learn.

I'd like to indicate blocking people on Linkedin, people who told the OP that he/she was wrong. Could you please show me the correct way?

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    The grammar is OK, but it is a bit awkward however you arrange it, and might be ambiguous. Consider restructuring, e.g. "When someone tells you you're wrong, blocking them on LinkedIn doesn't help you to learn."
    – Stuart F
    Oct 5, 2022 at 12:01
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    All the sentences are ungrammatical for irrelevant reasons. You need 2 you's after tell -- tell you (that) you were wrong. As for the position of on LinkedIn, it can go either way. Since it's short and the relative clause is long, Extraposition from NP will move the clause to the end, where it's easier to understand, and leave on LinkedIn behind. Oct 5, 2022 at 14:08
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    'Blocking people who told you were wrong on Linkedin doesn't help you to learn' is ambiguous: 'Blocking people who told you were wrong in what you said on Linkedin doesn't help you to learn' vs 'Blocking people (on Linkedin) who told you were wrong doesn't help you to learn'. Oct 5, 2022 at 19:07
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    Yup. Any written sentence is multiply ambiguous; hearing the intonation pronounced often clears it up, but reading doesn't always equip us for that. Oct 5, 2022 at 20:30
  • Thanks @JohnLawler, for the very explanatory answer that you linked, and for pointing the obvious mistakes out. I will not fix them here though, since Edwin referred to them in his comment. Thanks again. Oct 6, 2022 at 13:14

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In a comment John Lawler wrote:

All the sentences are ungrammatical for irrelevant reasons. You need 2 you's after tell -- tell you (that) you were wrong. As for the position of on LinkedIn, it can go either way. Since it's short and the relative clause is long, Extraposition from NP will move the clause to the end, where it's easier to understand, and leave on LinkedIn behind.

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