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I saw the following sentence earlier:

We’ll help you win across every channel, every format and on your terms.

I interpret that as one of the following:

  • We’ll help you win; [across every channel], [every format], [on your terms].
    • But "help you win...every format" doesn't seem intentional, even if it is grammatically correct.
  • We’ll help you win across; [every channel], [every format], [on your terms].
    • But "help you win across...on your terms" is not correct.

I feel like the sentence should repeat "across" like it repeats "every":

We’ll help you win across every channel, across every format and on your terms.

  • Is my version more correct? Is it better, or am I trying to be too logical?
  • Is there a term for a list where a preceding word applies to more than one item but not all items?
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  • Your version works. I'd use: We’ll help you win across every channel and format. and do it on your own terms. Apr 10, 2022 at 20:21
  • According to many, though, you oughta have a comma after format. They'd think it was uneducated. Opinions differ. Apr 11, 2022 at 17:23

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Is there a term for a list where a preceding word applies to more than one item but not all items?

It’s an example of non-parallel sentence structure.

Your quotation is apparently from a company called Magnite, which seems to be a real company.

The use of grammatical error in advertising is a means of getting and keeping attention:

”Everybody doesn’t like something, but nobody doesn’t like Sara Lee.”

”Think different.”

Don’t they know? Of course they know.

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