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The grammar of the following sentences may not be correct, but you should be able to get the gist of how I want to structure the sentences.

My question is how to make the sentences grammatically correct (in regards to the use of colon, semicolon, etc..) if they aren't already.

So for example:

  • Of the required study-prerequisites courseA, courseB, and courseC; he has taken only courseA.

  • In regards to your choices choiceA, choiceB, or choiceC; I would recommend going with choice B.

  • With respect to the games: gameA, gameB, gameC, and gameD; I find gameA to be the funnest.

Really, I'm just not sure as to what the grammar should be for any sentence in which one introduces a list (where the introduction is not an independent clause) and then comments on an item of the list with an independent clause.

Is what I have correct? If not, how would it be done?

Additionally, how would one comment (with not necessarily an independent clause) on each item of the list?

So, if the above were correct, would we just do the following:

  • Of the required study-prerequisites courseA, courseB, and courseC; he has passed courseA; failed courseB; and has yet to take courseC.

Thank you

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A semicolon is used to join two independent clauses. When in doubt I use an em dash.

Of the required study-prerequisites courseA, courseB, and courseC — he has taken only courseA.

In regards to your choices choiceA, choiceB, or choiceC — I would recommend going with choice B.

With respect to the games: gameA, gameB, gameC, and gameD — I find gameA to be the funnest.

Regarding your second question, only use semicolons to separate list items that themselves contain a comma.

Of the required study-prerequisites courseA, courseB, and courseC — he has passed courseA, failed courseB, and has yet to take courseC.

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