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once my student used the term but although, I corrected her and asked her to use 'although' instead. He insisted he had seen this word before.

I looked up and found we actually have this word. Is it common? Can we use these two words together? I found some examples from new york times and Guardian. Probably in Ame English?

Guardian: But although I understand their arguments, I disagree.

But although the city was outraged, the murder went unsolved.

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    Sounds awfully repetitious. Not to say you couldn't come up with an artificial sentence that forced the words next to each without actually working together: I am happy but, although it might not show, still grumpy. Jan 25, 2021 at 21:21
  • As an experienced teacher, I know when to stop my students. I write their errors and mention their errors at the end. learn not to judge others. @casabel.
    – user68857
    Jan 25, 2021 at 22:47
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    BTW...if you do not want to be judged based only on the quality of your post, I suggest that you complete the Biography part of your Profile page ...it would help. Jan 26, 2021 at 22:12

1 Answer 1

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But and although are entirely separate here, with different discourse functions: there is nothing wrong with using both of them.

But is connecting the sentence to the existing discourse, and expressing that this sentence is in some way differing or countering what has gone before.

Although is specifying some concession in the following sentence: this concession may or may not have been introduced to the discourse already.

But although I understand their arguments, I disagree.

and

Although I understand their arguments, I disagree.

have the same denotative meaning, but their role in the discourse is different: in the first, the speaker is giving notice that the sentence is somehow countering what has gone before, thye usual function of initial but.

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  • Thank you very much for your comprehensive response
    – user68857
    Jan 25, 2021 at 21:48

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