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As the title says: Is there an established word or phrase for a "regent-ee," as distinct from a reigning monarch who does not have* a regent?

From 1811 to 1820, the future King George IV was prince regent and his father King George III was...?

From 1715 to 1723, Philippe d'Orléans was regent and the infant King Louis XV was...?

The Tongzhi Emperor had* regents of one form or another for essentially his whole reign; he was a...?

From a modern perspective we might say king in name only; but I'm interested in contemporary attested terminology, if any.

I could imagine that there might be attested terms for some kinds of regent-ees (maybe along the lines of "king infant," "king invalid") but not a general term; if you have evidence for any such, that'd make a good answer.

* — As a minor bonus question: is it correct to say "King George III had a regent for the latter part of his reign"? Or is there a better verb for the relationship between sovereign and regent? I'd think that anything like "served under" or "was subject to" would be inappropriate, as would "employed" or "retained."

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    I've never heard of such a word. George III was still king even though a regent had been appointed. Sep 1, 2020 at 8:07
  • Though it certainly isn't common, you might be able to describe such a person as the de jure monarch (with the regent being the de facto monarch). Nov 6, 2022 at 4:41

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There is no regent-ee or similar term. The ascension to the throne of the next in line is automatic and immediate upon the death or abdication of the former monarch. Until that time, the current monarch is and remains the monarch. Ascension of the next in line is then later formalized ceremonially.

Regent is the term used for one who is advising or acting in place of a minor or a temporarily absent or disabled monarch - akin to a vp becoming acting president while the still current president is anesthetized.

So to answer your follow up question - 'As a minor bonus question: is it correct to say "King George III had a regent for the latter part of his reign"?' - Yes. Prince George, later known as King George IV, was in fact a Prince and heir apparent at the time of his regency to his ailing father George III. Due to the fact that he was concurrently regent to his father he was known as Prince Regent, retaining his current title and adding his additional title as Regent.

Also, 'The Tongzhi Emperor had* regents of one form or another for essentially his whole reign; he was a...?' ... He was an Emperor with regents...

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    Depends on your monarchy. Some did not regard the monarch as having ascended until the coronation, leaving an interregnum. This could be prolonged by having an elective monarchy, or other, less regular disputes over the throne.
    – Mary
    Oct 7, 2022 at 3:59
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    In the context of the questions, the answers above are correct. Additionally, I skipped this one from the above questions as it followed the others: 'From 1715 to 1723, Philippe d'Orléans was regent and the infant King Louis XV was...?' King. There was no question regarding interregnums. If they are to be discussed it should be under a different question as there are laws and nuances which vary historically, legally, and situationally.
    – user465347
    Oct 7, 2022 at 15:52
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Monarch regnant has been used (English Wikipedia, in referencing a Prince Regent, says they act "as regent in the stead of a monarch regnant"), but generally, "king" or the proper equivalent is most common.

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  • The usage of 'regnant' with 'queen' (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queen_regnant) seems opposed to the usage you suggest for 'monarch regnant' - also, 'regent' does not always mean that that person actually rules in the kings stead (" Regent is sometimes a formal title granted to a monarch's most trusted advisor or personal assistant." (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regent))
    – loonquawl
    Sep 11, 2022 at 9:16

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