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Let's say I am comparing two software products. And one of them offers more features (functionality). What adjective would you use to describe the size of their feature sets?

First program has larger/broader/wider feature set.

Second program has smaller/narrower feature set.

Are these correct? Or would you write something else?

Edit: This is for an internal document for the sales department (so I would say it should use "marketing language"). It's the comparison of two software products, the one with more features is supposed to be better.

Thanks

  • What did your dictionaries and search engines leave unclear about that, please, rluks? – Robbie Goodwin Apr 15 '18 at 20:25
  • @RobbieGoodwin which dictionaries or resources would you recommend when looking for a reference (in this case)? I usually use collocation dictionary at freecollocation.com – rluks Apr 16 '18 at 10:57
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    Again, context is king. Are you marketing the narrower feature set as something positive? Is this just an explanation for the larger feature set being more expensive? Or is this a product comparison between two different vendors? – Spencer Aug 19 '18 at 13:00
  • It's the latter. Comparison of two products, the one with more features is supposed to be better. This is for an internal document for the sales department (so I would say it should use "marketing language"). – rluks Aug 19 '18 at 13:21
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First program is more feature-rich.

A system is said to be feature-rich when it has many options and functional capabilities available to the user.

source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Software_feature

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larger and smaller are the least semantically loaded. Since few people are unopinionated about the value of a larger or smaller feature set in most contexts, it's important to decide whether you want to communicate your opinion, be neutral or even mitigate the possible bias of the audience.

Broadly positive for larger: broad, full, rich, comprehensive

Ambiguous for larger: packed

Negaive for larger: baroque, overloaded

Broadly positive for small: lean, minimalist, austere

Mostly negative for smaller: narrow, meagre

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