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Generally, given that there are two statements are true:

  • A is not O in X.

  • A is not O in Y.

Question: To combine the two sentences into one, should one say which of the following (?):

  • A is not O, either in X or in Y.

or

  • A is not O, neither in X nor in Y.

  • A is not O, both in X and in Y.

What does each sentence mean? Could some of them mean the same?

e.g. To be more specific, A can be an Apple, O can be an Orange.

  • An Apple is not an Orange in the X city.

  • An Apple is not an Orange in the Y city.

  • An Apple is not an Orange, either in the X city or in the Y city.

  • An Apple is not an Orange, neither in the X city nor in the Y city.

  • I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's not about English – AmE speaker Aug 3 '18 at 20:56
  • There are many related previous questions (which are not closed). But mine is different. – wonderich Aug 3 '18 at 21:58
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"A is not O, either in X or in Y." implies that X and Y are the only two options. If there is some Z for which A might be O, it would better to say "In both X and Y, A is not O." You can also say "A is O in neither X nor Y".

  • Thanks, +1, how about this one: "A is not O, neither in X nor in Y" ? – wonderich Aug 3 '18 at 16:22

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