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In Dutch there is a specialist term used in education, ''cesuur'', to designate the minimal performance that should translate to a passing grade. For example in a multiple choice exam with 40 questions, the ''cesuur'' might be at 27 questions, meaning that you need at least 27 correct answers to pass this exam. Online dictionaries that I've checked only list translations for other meanings of ''cesuur'', which would translate to ``caesura''.

Is this the correct translation in that context of examination or is there a better term?

2

The term passing grade should be perfectly understood.

From the Cambridge Dictionary:

US ALSO passing mark, UK pass mark

the number of points that must be achieved in order to be successful in an exam

  • I suspect grade is far more common than mark in American English. – stevesliva Jul 7 '18 at 13:05
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pass mark
noun [ C ] UK ​ /ˈpɑːs ˌmɑːk/ US ​ /ˈpæs ˌmɑːrk/ uk us passing grade, passing mark

the number of points that must be achieved in order to be successful in an exam

— from https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/pass-mark

and examples from the same page:

Again, this was a pass mark.
— From the Hansard archive

I hope that the scoring system will be so structured that a building cannot be given a pass mark unless it satisfies all the requirements.
— From the Hansard archive

The pass mark for the hazard perception element will be 57 out of 75, which is higher than the mark for learner drivers.
— From the Hansard archive

The initial test pass mark has also been raised.
— From the Hansard archive

We have reviewed the standard and raised the pass mark required for the initial written knowledge test.
— From the Hansard archive

The pass mark was the same throughout the country.
— From the Hansard archive

We could, of course, raise the standard of these tests and say that 50 is the pass mark.
— From the Hansard archive

The danger of receiving a pass mark from the machine is that it could lead positive vetters away from a present or future spy.
— From the Hansard archive

Last year the pass mark (out of 200) was 84 and the minimum mark required for a distinction was 154.
— From Cambridge English Corpus

The 0 coefficients vary between 0.44 and 0.67 for the 50 per cent pass mark and between 0.44 and 0.74 for the 70 per cent pass mark.
— From Cambridge English Corpus

The pass mark for the hazard perception part of the test has been progressively raised since introduction as instructors and their pupils became accustomed to the new assessment.
— From the Hansard archive

The pass mark was 75%.
— From Cambridge English Corpus

They maintain that it is what they call a "good pass mark".
— From the Hansard archive

Can we have a guarantee that we are going for assessment and not a pass mark?
— From the Hansard archive

How would students react to you setting a pass mark of say 80%?
— From Cambridge English Corpus

1

I can't find a solitary word to describe, but "passing score" can be used. Also, "adequate score" or better yet, "acceptable score," which kind of insinuates that it's not a brilliant score, but it'll suffice. Or to say it with a bit of slang, "They passed by the skin of their teeth."

1

"Minimum passing marks" or "Qualifying marks" is what we often use in India.

1

I just found cut-off score:

The term cut-off score refers to the lowest possible score on an exam, standardized test, high-stakes test, or other form of assessment that a student must earn to either “pass” or be considered “proficient.”

This resonates with the etymological meaning of ''cesuur'' of ''a cut''.

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