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I am confused about how to use the verb "materializes". Consider the following sentence:

"Being a blacksmith is great because all the effort you put into your profession materializes as actual physical objects that you can marvel at."

Is it correct to say "materializes as"? Or is it more appropriate to say "materializes into"? They both sound correct to me in this context, which is why I am unsure about which one to use.

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I think materialize may be the wrong word in this case. Rather than materializing into or as something, a thing materializes when it moves from potentiality to actuality.

(of ideas and wishes) to become real or true

Instead, I propose yield:

"to supply or produce something positive such as a profit, an amount of food, or information"

"Being a blacksmith is great because all the effort you put into your profession yields actual physical objects that you can marvel at."

  • Thank you Joshua! The word "Yield" is a lot more appropriate. – DiMarzeloBellafonte Jul 31 '17 at 21:08
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Both are correct.
internet search for "as"
internet search for "into"
There is a slight preference for "as" in the statement that you have provided since it is probably an ongoing process. If it were a single event, "into" would be slightly preferred. These are very slight preferences and there can be areas that are not very distinct. Either can definitely be used.

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