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I came across this work in my work, I am not sure which one to use for a screen menu in our application, "pre-booking" or "booking". This menu will allow users to book their work schedule in advance. Is there any difference between the two ?

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  • Welcome to ELU. Please show what your own research yields. What information does a dictionary give you about those words. Please have a look at the Help Center to find out more about posting good questions.
    – Helmar
    Jul 24, 2016 at 10:02
  • Consider a similar construction: pre-order vs order. Pre-book should mean something like place on a queue before the organisers are properly ready to accept bookings, but in practice, pre-book is often used as a synonym for book, which already has the notion of in advance.
    – Lawrence
    Jul 24, 2016 at 13:47
  • I've seen "pre-booking" used in a couple of ways. One is where there is a normal period during which reservation can be made. Pre-booking is used for reservations made before, and outside of, the normal process, often by special arrangements. Another refers to something that is closer to "calling dibs" on a preference, or reserving a specific booking option, but isn't binding.
    – fixer1234
    Jun 28, 2017 at 19:37

1 Answer 1

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Pre-booking specifically denotes that you have booked something in advance,

Book (something) in advance: a pre-booked hotel reservation (ODO)

whilst booking

Reserve accommodation for (someone): his secretary had booked him into the hotel (ODO)

merely connotes these meanings and booking would refer to the reservation more generally and not specifically the act of booking it beforehand

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  • Can you add your sources, please.
    – Helmar
    Jul 24, 2016 at 10:38
  • @Helmar Editted Jul 24, 2016 at 11:14
  • What do you mean by 'motto' here? Can you rephrase the last line?
    – NVZ
    Jun 26, 2017 at 18:06
  • @NVZ I'm not sure why the word 'motto' was in there, I can only think it was a typo Jun 27, 2017 at 16:05

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