4

I'm looking for a British equivalent of 'bang for your buck'.

I thought 'power for your pound' , but I'm not sure if that works well.

  • 6
    more bang for your bob? more squid for your quid? – rhetorician May 13 '16 at 15:48
  • 1
    More pints for your pence. – user662852 May 13 '16 at 18:15
  • Does the word "buck" refer exclusively to US currency (when it's referring to money at all that is)? It's not the official name for the dollar by any means. Do other English-speaking nations which use dollars (e.g. Canada, Australia) ever call them bucks? – Darrel Hoffman May 13 '16 at 21:48
  • @rhetorician More quid for the quid-pro-quo. – SeldomNeedy May 13 '16 at 23:03
  • @DarrelHoffman They do in Canada. – Azor Ahai May 13 '16 at 23:31
3

Try get your money's worth

to get good value

Also try more bounce for the ounce or worth every penny, although not that British.

worth the entire amount that was paid for something.

3

in Scotland they say "a bargain at twice the price", which doesn't have the punch of 'bang for the buck', but does have the advantage of lending itself to the ironic 'a bargain at half the price', which is often heard as well.

2

Value for money:

  • (British) Used in reference to something that is well worth the money spent on it: this camera is really good value for money

(ODO)

  • Interesting that it’s not value for the money... – Jim May 13 '16 at 14:21
  • @Jim Why? It's not "bang for the buck" in the USA. – TrevorD May 13 '16 at 14:26
  • 2
    @TrevorD- Yes it is. books.google.com/ngrams/… – Jim May 13 '16 at 14:35
  • Bang for the/your buck: dictionary.com/browse/more-bang-for-the-buck – user66974 May 13 '16 at 14:37
  • @Jim OK. I was going from what the questioner wrote, & the expressions I've heard. I stand corrected. – TrevorD May 13 '16 at 16:00

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.