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He went to the nearest village and ( there) in the bazaar, he found various kinds of meat and fish.

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  • Technically, the referent for "there" is "[in] the nearest village." The following phrase "in the bazaar" simply narrows the relevant portion of "the nearest village" to the place where the meat and fish were on offer.
    – Sven Yargs
    Jun 28, 2015 at 7:58
  • Interesting question! I hope you end up getting a solid answer. :)
    – F.E.
    Jun 28, 2015 at 8:59
  • Also, consider: "Here in the bazaar, he found various kinds of meat and fish".
    – F.E.
    Jun 28, 2015 at 9:06
  • There is a deictic word. It's part of a set of deictic words: here, there, where, hither, thither, whither, hence, thence, whence, etc. Fillmore explains it in the Deixis Lectures. Jun 28, 2015 at 14:58

1 Answer 1

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It means: in, at, or to that place or position.

When "there" follows a location, it refers to that location. Example:

We went to London and stayed there ten days.

Your sentence can be written to:

He went to the nearest village and (in that village) in the bazaar, he found various kinds of meat and fish.

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  • The word "there" means "in the nearest village", doesn't it? How about "in the bazaar"? Jun 28, 2015 at 4:26
  • Yes, when "there"comes after a location - e.g. "in the nearest village", "London", it refers back to that place. "in the bazaar" means inside the village, there is a marketplace (bazaar). Jun 28, 2015 at 4:31

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