2

I am writing a formal technical report and I would like some advice about an expression I want to use. I have a sentence which I want to make more formal:

The merit of their approach is that there is not a need of designing a fusion strategy for the several modalities.

Basically I want to change the ‘there is not a need for’ to something more formal. Any suggestions?

  • 2
    ...that it does not necessitate a fusion strategy for the several modalities? – Anonym Apr 28 '15 at 17:12
  • 2
    Somebody confirm, but shouldn't it be "...there is not a need to design..." – Mari-Lou A May 2 '15 at 11:15
  • The second request says: "not a need for" but in the quote it is: not a need of". The former flows better. – Mari-Lou A May 2 '15 at 11:22
3

I want to change the ‘there is not a need for’ to something more formal.

"The merit of their approach is that it circumvents the necessity of designing ..."

circumvent verb: find a way around (an obstacle).

• overcome (a problem or difficulty), typically in a clever and surreptitious way. "I found it quite easy to circumvent security";

synonyms: avoid, get around, get past, evade, bypass, sidestep, dodge; informal duck; "the checkpoints were easy to circumvent"; Google circumvent

4

The merit of their approach is that there is not a need of designing a fusion strategy for the several modalities.

In general the determiner "no" can be more concise than a combination of a negated auxiliary and a. In other words There is no need might be more elegant here than "There is not a need". Secondly, the noun need normally takes preposition phrases headed by the preposition for or infinitival clauses. So the Original Poster's sentence might read better thus:

The merit of their approach is that there is no need to design a fusion strategy for the several modalities.

2

The merit of their approach is that it eliminates the need for multiple/several fusion strategies.

Or to the extent that my rewording changes the meaning too much:

eliminates the need to design/for designing a [different/separate] fusion strategy for [each of] the several modalities.

(For other good alternatives to “eliminates the need [for/to],” see the answers to this somewhat related question: What's a word for "to eliminate the need for"?)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.