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As a result, I am able to be understanding and accommodating to the people that I work with, including clients, which I believe is an important asset for a professional to have.

I wanted to make sure it is absolutely known that I mean to acknowledge clients as a class of people I can work with. Is this the right way to include it with commas?

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    There's a clumsy pairing of ' ... able to be understanding and accommodating to people' with 'which I believe is an important asset ...'. – Edwin Ashworth Jan 15 '15 at 0:40
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Yes, this is correct. This is an example of parenthetical commas. You may also use em-dashes or parentheses here:

…the people that I work with, including clients, which I believe…

…the people that I work with–including clients–which I believe…

…the people that I work with (including clients) which I believe…

In this case, I find commas preferable.

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If you want to emphasize your working with clients, you should use long dash instead of comma, imho.

PS. This is a sidebar observation, but why go to the trouble of "be able to be"? Why don't we just say "As a result, I can understand and accommodate...."?

I understand sometimes "be able to" followed by a verb sounds better/nicer than "can" followed by the same verb. But in this case the gerund form just makes it sound so laborious and long-winded.

  • "You're working" :) – rory.ap Jan 15 '15 at 2:08
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I think what you have is fine with the commas. However, if you want to make it even less ambiguous, you could reword it:

As a result, I am able to be understanding and accommodating to the people that I work with, including clients, and I believe this is an important asset for a professional to have.

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