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I am wondering if "in the scope of" and "in the field of" can be used interchangeably?

Such as:

  1. ... possesses knowledge and skills in the field of general problems of computer science as well as technical skills in the scope of information systems.
  2. ... possesses knowledge and skills in the field of general problems of computer science as well as technical skills in the field of information systems.

Thank you in advance.

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  • I find scope is not applicable in this sentence
    – mplungjan
    Oct 9, 2013 at 13:42
  • @mplungjan it sounds odd but it makes sense to me. There is such a thing as a scope for a particular topic, and the example implies that one's technical skills must be within this scope.
    – MattLBeck
    Oct 9, 2013 at 14:00
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    Perhaps if you revised it to "within the scope of information systems" it may sound better, but I would stick with "field."
    – userNaN
    Oct 9, 2013 at 14:01
  • Now, is this correct sentence? Oct 9, 2013 at 14:28
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    ... possesses knowledge and skills in the field of general problems of computer science as well as technical skills within the scope of information systems. Oct 9, 2013 at 14:29

2 Answers 2

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"scope" is subjective, from one's point of view

"This is beyond the scope of my knowledge"

"field" is objective, from an external and common point of view

"The field of biology has been revolutionized by Darwin and Wallace". "The scope of their independent investigations was the same, and they both concluded simultaneously that species are not fixed".

Information systems exist independently of you, so use "field".

But supposing you make a breakthrough in quantum computing, it would fall within your scope.

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In this context I would say "in the field of". The meaning is similar, but "in the field of" sounds more natural. Avoid using "in the scope of" because it does not sound so natural.

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  • I checked in the Oxford Reference : they show "in the scope of" ; why do you feel this expression as unnatural ? You may say "in the view of everybody", no ? Oct 9, 2013 at 15:22

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