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I want to say 'I would like to count the number of patent applications which is eventually granted and the number of applications which is non-granted.' is it correct? how can i express the meaning simply and correct ?

thanks in advance. best regards, Alex

  • I don't think the occurrence of the second "which" is problematic. But please change "is" to "are". You could if you wished say "... the number of patent applications which are eventually granted and the number that are non-granted. – BillJ Jul 9 '18 at 17:14
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Your use of "which" is great! But I've got a couple of other suggestions for you:

1) There's more than 1 patent application, so you need "are eventually granted" rather than "is"

2) "Non-granted" is awkward - I would say "not granted"

3) A comma between the two phrases in your sentence might improve readability, as it's a natural point to pause in the middle

So your sentence might end up looking like

I would like to count the number of patent applications which are eventually granted, and the number of applications which are not granted.

I've put a few of those words in italics because you could cut them out of the sentence to make it more concise if you like.

  • I come up another question. How about "I would like to count both the numbers of patent applications which are eventually granted and not granted. " for short? – Bruce Huang Jul 9 '18 at 18:00

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