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I was watching the third episode of the show White Famous, and came across this line:

So listen, I can get you into any restaurant in town any night of the week. We can sit so close to the Lakers, you can make out cock and ball definition.

What does the highlighted sentence mean? My understanding is:

  1. "Make out" means "to see"
  2. "cock and ball" means "very good"
  3. "definition" means "clarity"

So the sentence means "You can see them very clearly."

However, the online dictionary says "make out" means "to see, especially with difficulty," while here it feels like the opposite of "with difficulty". I'm also not sure if "cock and ball" actually refers to something else.

Is my interpretation correct, or is there something I'm missing here?

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Copied from Dan Bron's comment:

Cock and balls means their genitals. You will be sitting so close to the players, you will be able to see the shapes of their penises and testicles through their shorts. “Make out” and “definition” because you’re seeing the shape pressing through the cloth. It’s usually not easy to see. Like the old adage “don’t shoot until you see the whites of their eyes” (meaning wait until they’re very close before shooting, to minimize the risk of missing your shot and wasting ammunition).

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    I've not lived a sheltered life, but I have to say, this is a new one on me. – WS2 Dec 21 '17 at 19:08
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The term is actually a "Cock and Bull story" and refer to barnyard critters.

Google [sic] defines them as an absurd, improbable story presented as the truth: Example:"Don't ask him about his ancestry unless you want to hear a cock-and-bull story."

First recorded in 1600-10; probably with orig. reference to some fable in which a cock and bull figure

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    They were sitting so close, they could listen to bullshit stories from the players? That makes zero sense in context. You seem to be grasping at straws that just happen to sound similar. – flith Dec 21 '17 at 18:58
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    Welcome to EL&U. While your research on "Cock and Bull" appears to be correct, it is not an answer to the original question. – Rupert Morrish Dec 21 '17 at 19:34

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