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I'm a Chinese student, and in my recent writing exercise, I wrote a sentence as follows:

Maybe he is not capable of conquering the sea now, for his flesh too weak, his strength so poor and his will not steady enough.

And my teacher marked that in the three separate sentences, "is" is necessary, and the correct sentence should be:

for his flesh is too weak, his strength is so poor and his will is not steady enough.

I'm now confused, I've seen sentences like the first one before, so is it correct to write like the first sentence?

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    Yes, include "is" three more times. – GEdgar Aug 25 '17 at 10:49
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    You can skip the last two, but not the one after "flesh": Maybe he is not capable of conquering the sea now, for his flesh is too weak, his strength so poor and his will not steady enough. Maybe that's the pattern you've seen before. – michael.hor257k Aug 25 '17 at 10:53
  • Many thanks Micheal and Edgar! Michael you solve my problem, that's exactly the sentence in my hazy memory ! – Fuze Aug 25 '17 at 10:59
  • It not necessary. – thomj1332 Aug 25 '17 at 19:35
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The sentence is correct with the three extra 'is's, but also with only one of them. The first extra 'is' is necessary, but it's presence is then "assumed" after flesh and strength. "Maybe he is not capable of conquering the sea now; for: his flesh is too weak, his strength so poor and his will not steady enough."

I would also put a semi-colon after "now" to separate the initial statement from the explanatory list. (If there were only one or two reasons why he may not be capable, a comma would suffice.) In other words, a comma there has a different purpose than the one after "weak".

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