1

I was leaning against a tree on the hill , sitting.

My query is whether or not we should treat "sitting" as present participle with adverbial meaning, or as past-continuous tense.

To clarify , I want to show them in example

I was leaning against a tree on the hill while sitting.

or

I was leaning against a tree on the hill and I was sitting.

What meaning does "sitting" in the original sentence ascribe to the overall meaning of the sentence?

  • I don't follow the difference you intend to make between the two examples. – Colin Fine Jan 31 '16 at 19:54
  • To which of these two examples is the original sentence the most closest in terms of meaning? @ColinFine – Cihangir Çam Jan 31 '16 at 19:59
  • I can't see a significant difference between the meanings of the two examples. – Colin Fine Jan 31 '16 at 20:10
  • "I sat, leaning against the tree." is one way to say it. So is "I was seated, leaning against the tree." (I am also a bit confused by the question.) – The Nate Feb 4 '16 at 15:41
1

I was sitting up against a tree on the hill. To me, I think that leaning is implied.....compared to; I was sitting straight as an arrow up against a tree on the hill. By definition, if you are sitting up against a tree, leaning is implied.

  • the action of leaning could be realized through sitting or standing.I added "sitting" to imply how I was leaning.@Lambie – Cihangir Çam Jan 31 '16 at 19:56
  • If the focus is sitting up against, the leaning is implied. There is no need to say it. However, there would be a need to say straight to remove the implied leaning. – Lambie Jan 31 '16 at 20:13

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.