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Is there a single word in English the fits the meaning of:

To learn more about a subject through reading, discussing, etc.

Here's some context: this is an abstract of the full article. For those who wish to ______, the full article can be found at WWW.XXX.COM.

Thanks!

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    There are lots of words for learn. To learn more requires two words; in the context of your example, learn more is perfect. Other constructions become awkward: educate themselves further, etc. – anongoodnurse Dec 26 '14 at 8:37
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I am not aware of a single word that fits the OP's request, the phrase "to learn more" is the easiest and most idiomatic solution but there are other viable alternatives.

  1. For those who wish to delve deeper, the full article can be found at WWW.XXX.Com.

To delve deeper into something implies that the article under discussion is fairly vast. To delve means to to examine something more closely, to physically search for something.

Otherwise, if the op is interested in creating a more succinct phrasing then may I suggest the following

  1. Further details of the full article can be found at WWW.XXX.Com.
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I would say "for those who wish to learn more" or "for further reading".

The term "self-enrichment" comes to mind, but it sounds awkward in the context you've supplied.

chris

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  • Hi Chris- thanks for your suggestions- but I'm curious if there is a one-word answer. I agree that "self-enrichment" sounds awkward... – Ilanysong Dec 26 '14 at 8:25
  • Maybe you could just say "for more, the full article can be found at blah.bla." One could argue that it's lacking in specificity. but that shortcoming is redeemed a bit by context, especially as (i'm guessing) it will be used over and over in a series of entries. – chris watts Jan 3 '15 at 15:56
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As a single word read may fit: (from TFD)

  • To examine and grasp the meaning of (written or printed characters, words, or sentences).
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  • Hi Josh - I don't think I could use the word "study" here. Could you replace the blank in the sentence above with study? I don't think it works... – Ilanysong Dec 26 '14 at 8:24

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