1

He will not agree to marry her even if they offer him a big flat

He will not agree to marry her even though they offer him a big flat

I'm a new English learner, hence I don't know what i wrote is correct: most of Indian English speakers say that both are used interchangeably as well as me too , however I wanna know these word. Please explain to me

2

No, they do not mean the same thing. As explained (for example) here:

Even though means despite the fact that and is a more emphatic version of though and although.

Even if means whether or not and has to do with the conditions that may apply.

Your two sentences thus mean different things. In the first case, you are saying "he will not agree to marry her" no matter what. If they offer him a big flat, he will not agree to marry; if they don't offer him a big flat, he will not agree to marry.

In the second case, you are implying that he has been offered a big flat, and despite that fact, he still will not marry.

It's a subtle difference, but there's a clear change in emphasis.

1

"Even though" means that the event has happened or is expected to happen. "Even if" means that the condition is hypothetical. Generally we use "even if" when the event has NOT happened.

So if you said, "He won't marry her even though they offered him a big flat", that means that they (her parents?) DID offer him a big flat, and he still refused.

"He won't marry her even if they offered him a big flat" means that they have not made such an offer, but that if they did make such an offer, he still would not accept.

  • 2
    "He wouldn't marry her even if they offered him a big flat", or "He won't marry her even if they offer him a big flat" – tunny Nov 20 '14 at 14:37
0

Both are used for contrasting one story with another.

  • Even though is affirmative of the first story. Even though is used for contrasting/comparing a factual situation with another situation.
  • Even if is hypothetical about the first story. Even if is used for contrasting or comparing a proposed/non-factual/imaginary/hypothetical situation with another situation.

Affirmative here means that it is a fact. A fact that has happened, is happening or is planned and affirmed to happen in the future.

  • I simply don't understand why someone would bother to vote me down for such a simple explanation. – Blessed Geek Nov 21 '14 at 17:41
  • Who knows? -- my answer here too received a downvote with no explanation. – Athanasius Nov 22 '14 at 1:42

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.