0

Which is the proper preposition, from or of?:

There are many opportunities from/of the energy turnaround.

  • I wouldn't use either - they both seem a bit "weird" to me. "The energy turnaround presents many opportunities", perhaps. But "opportunities" aren't really a quality that can be said to reside within some process, so linking them with a preposition such as from/of seems a bit "flowery" to me. – FumbleFingers Mar 19 '14 at 14:19
  • Ok. So in the following sentence: "The analysis of the indirect risks and opportunities from/of the energy transition for non-energy- intensive industries is based on a broad survey.", should I rather say: "The analysis of the indirect risks and opportunities coming/arising from the energy transition for non-energy- intensive industries is based on a broad survey." ? – Juanita Mar 19 '14 at 14:27
  • Prepositions describe a relationship between whatever the prepositional phrase modifies and the object of the preposition. In order to arrive a good answer to your question, you'll have to describe the relationship clearly. What are some examples of these opportunities associated with the energy turnaround? – Michael Owen Sartin Mar 19 '14 at 14:33
  • The new policies related to the the German energy turnaround create a demand for energy efficient products, and thus for innovations. The energy turnaround can, hence, also create new business opportunities. Bottom line, the energy turnaround creates opportunities. This is the relationship I'm referring to. Thanks again! – Juanita Mar 19 '14 at 14:37
  • @Juanita: If I were you I wouldn't try to cram so much into one sentence in the first place. For example, you seem to have committed yourself to only analysing the indirect risks and opportunities. Does that imply you think there aren't any advantages or disadvantages that directly arise from whatever "transition" you're analysing? Or are you just going to ignore those? – FumbleFingers Mar 19 '14 at 14:41
4

Well I'd say "The are many opportunities in the energy turnaround." is better.

Some alternatives:

The are many opportunities to be found in the energy turnaround.

The are many opportunities arising from the energy turnaround.

The are many opportunities created by the energy turnaround.

  • 1
    due to, as a result of, stemming from – Canis Lupus Mar 19 '14 at 14:34
0

Having now read OP's comment, I'd change "arising from/of" to "associated with." It occurs to me that the verb/participle choice helps to determine which preposition works best.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.