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Given (as an example) an adjective form "liable" and the noun form "liability" what is the technical term (if any) that describes the relationships mapping one to the other?

Here are some other examples:

  • available (j) & availability (n)
  • red (j) & redness (n)
  • culpable (j) & culpability (n)

The closest thing I could find was "derivationally related form" or "derivation", but I'd like to know the more specific way to describe the adj<-->noun relationships.

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    The usual term is 'de-adjectival noun' for nouns formed this way. The process involved is called 'nominalisation'. – BillJ May 15 '17 at 15:16
  • Non-technical suggestion: the noun derived from culpable. – aparente001 May 16 '17 at 6:00
  • Thanks @BillJ ... I did some more research and this seems to be the correct answer. If you add this as an answer instead of a comment I'll mark it as accepted! – binarymax May 16 '17 at 15:15
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available (adj) & availability (noun)

red (adj) & redness (noun)

culpable (adj) & culpability (noun)

The usual term is 'de-adjectival noun' for nouns formed this way.

The process involved is called 'nominalisation'.

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A cognate is the technical term used in linguistics.

Cognate: (of a word) having the same linguistic derivation as another; from the same original word or root. (Ref)

For example, you could say, "Available and availability are cognates." or "The cognate adjective for culpability is culpable."

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    At first this seems correct, but then I found this on Wikipedia: "For example, English ward and guard (<PIE *wer-, "to perceive, watch out for") are cognates, as are shirt (garment on top) and skirt (garment on bottom) (<PIE *sker-, "to cut")." ..which seems too broad? Am I overanalyzing? – binarymax May 15 '17 at 15:46
  • If there is a more specific word, I am not aware of it. Let's wait to see if you get more answers! ;) – thomj1332 May 15 '17 at 15:52
  • 'De-adjectival noun' for noun so-formed and 'nominalisation' for the process involved. – BillJ May 15 '17 at 16:18
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    Thanks @BillJ - I would suggest adding your insight as an answer rather than a comment. – thomj1332 May 15 '17 at 16:56
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    I've always thought of cognates as similar words in two different languages--e.g., thaler, dollar. – Xanne May 15 '17 at 17:01

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