1
  1. With the growing of grass, ....
  2. With growing of grass, .....
  3. With the growth of grass, ....

Please say the differences among them. I can't differentiate among them.

I think the clauses stated above are dependent clause, but I am not sure. If all of them are dependent clauses, are the subjects of independent clauses same to the dependent clauses? For which cases, subjects of dependent clauses and independent clause are different? And when will it be same?

1

I can't differentiate among them.

1 and 3 are basically the same in meaning, though 2 is not really grammatical.

You could say something like

With the growing of grass, the potential for erosion is reduced.

And likewise—

With the growth of grass, the potential for erosion is reduced.

"The" is needed with both "growing" and "growth", or it sounds a bit awkward.

1

Those are prepositional phrases and not dependent clauses.

You're asking for the difference between these prepositional phrases:

With the growing of grass, .... With growing of grass, ..... With the growth of grass, ....

The only way to do this is to finish them by adding a clause.

1.) With the growing of grass, the landscape will become beautiful.

2.) With growing of grass, the landscape will become beautiful.

3.) With the growth of grass, the landscape will become beautiful.

Now that a clause has been added I'll try to give the roles of the prepositional phrases using, to the best of my abilities, Kenneth Burke's Grammar of Motives.

1.) With the growing of grass, the landscape will become beautiful.

The definite article "the" in this first one indicates that the speaker and listener have an shared agreement or shared understanding that grass is or will be or has been planted. This planting of grass is done or was done purposefully with the intent of making a change of the landscape. In this case, the purpose was or is to make the landscape more attractive.

This does not entirely mean that the definitely article could mean that the grass was done unintentionally or accidentally; accidental or unintentional grass growing is quite possible. But the use of the definite article "the" attaches some meaning of understanding. It may even attach what type of grass is being grown, intentionally or unintentionally.

At this point I would look at the meaning of "the" when attached to nouns and noun phrases.

When someone says "the dog bit me." It implies, sometimes subconsciously, that the listener and speaker have a shared understanding of what particular or specific dog is being talked about.

But it is also quite possible that the speaker and listener have different dogs in mind. The speaker maybe talking about their pet dog, Max but the listener, who may believe that their own pet dog could never hurt them, could assume it was the neighbor's dog.

Now we need to look at the gerund "growing" or any verb that ends with [-ing]. In this case I'll stick with "growing" because it's most relevant.

The use of "growing" in this sentence slips very subtly I'm our minds a progression of grass growing that the speaker and listener will witness on a recurring basis, like daily or maybe hourly(some grass does grow that fast). So the use of "growing" imbues in us an ongoing image of constant change or motion.

2.) With growing of grass, the landscape will become beautiful.

Here, the definite article is absent. But the semantics involved in sentence number one(above) still remains, but the sentence takes on a cultural aspect and thus can be described as more colloquial than formal.

If someone from the south was walking in a library and a book happened to fall on his head, he might say "damn book fell on me!"

Here an article is missing, but we know he means "A damn book fell on me!" Which is formal way of saying "damn book fell on me!"

3.) With the growth of grass, the landscape will become beautiful.

Here, the key different is growth.

One of the first definitions of "growth" in the Merriam Webster dictionary is "a stage of the process of growing."

Because the landscape is expecting to be beautiful, we can assume that the stage which the speaker is referring to is the final stage, where grass my cover nearly every foot of the landscape and is just about complete. It cannot mean when the grass has grown halfway in covering the landscape because it match the finality of the setting, which is a beautiful landscape.

I guess it's a good time to mention that when I say growing or growth of grass, I mean the spread and covering of grass, and not the height to which grass can grow.

The use of "growth" also seems to carry the idea that little attention to be paid to the process of it growing and the speaker and listener have little interest in any stage but the final stage, which is grown grass making the landscape beautiful.

Keep in mind that the definite article I also present here, so I would refer you to my explanation of number one.

  • Please say the differences among them. I think the meaning of these three clauses is not same. Would you like to clarify it? – Nazmul Hassan Nov 19 '15 at 4:32
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    The meanings are different but only slightly. I'll try anyways. Let me edit my answer a bit. – Danny Rodriguez Nov 19 '15 at 5:11
  • I am waiting eagerly for your answer. I think I am going to learn something from you. – Nazmul Hassan Nov 19 '15 at 5:18
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    Then "growing" and the "growth" of something mean about the same thing. But with "growing" comes the idea or image that something is in a process and is happening. The "growth" is the final state of something of something growing and no longer growing. – Danny Rodriguez Nov 19 '15 at 6:18
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    The second one is about the same as the first one. But the growth is the final product of growing and growing is the the process that will eventually lead the growth or the final product. – Danny Rodriguez Nov 19 '15 at 6:21

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