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Regarding the questions: What do you call those divisions of a book bigger than a paragraph but smaller than a chapter? Is not such a division best known as a PARICOPE from the Greek PARIKOPE or "a cutting around" as in the selection of a passage from the Bible in religious services?

marked as duplicate by RegDwigнt Jul 21 '14 at 20:47

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  • This is really just an answer to the original question, and the answers here are either comments on it, or (rather missing the point) duplicates of older answers there. – RegDwigнt Jul 21 '14 at 20:48
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No: most English speakers will fail to understand the ecclesiastical term of art pericope even if you spell it correctly, and section (sense 2) is in everyday use for that purpose.

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Also passage can convey the concept:

(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a section of a written work, speech, etc, esp one of moderate length.

Source:Collins English Dictionary

  • As a teacher of literature I generally use "passage" to mean a portion that I or a critic or a student might select for attention, but that is not deliberately demarcated from its context by the author or editor. "Section" applies whether it is typographically demarcated or not. – Brian Donovan Jul 21 '14 at 20:42
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LaTeX divides a Book into Chapters, a Chapter into Sections, a Section into SubSections, a SubSection into SubSubSections.

I think the notions propounded by LaTeX are representative of fairly modern thinking.

I am not sure whether a pericope corresponds to a Section, a SubSection, or a SubSubSection.

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