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I just was talking with my Enlish friend and I wanted to use a construction:

If yes - ok, if not - nothing bad will happen, right?

I am Russian and I am unsure if there is such idiom in English. It means that if not, no bad things will happen.

Also, did I used it correctly? Does "Nothing bad will happen" = "Nothing bad wouldn't happen"? (In my "Russian" mind it is stated this way.)

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    Your construction itself is a valid way to express this. A further, slightly more sophisticated example of use might be in answer to, 'Should I ask her out? What if she laughs?' You could reply, 'Why not? If she says yes, ok/great, if she says no, all you have lost is time and if she is mean, you dodged a bullet/don't want to waste time on her anyway.' – Sam May 13 '14 at 21:39
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In English, there is an understanding that a double negative equals a positive.

Your example:

Nothing bad wouldn't happen...

means everything that is bad would happen. Why? No thing which is bad would not happen.

The idiom is common in English as well. Often it's expressed either way, it's ok, or either way, it's good.

"Bad publicity or good publicity, it still exposes people to our mission. Either way, it's good."

If yes, ok; if not, nothing bad will happen, right? (punctuation edited)

is fine, as you did not use a double negative here. The not is separated from nothing. For a more common expression, make the last part a positive instead of a non-negative:

If yes, great; if not, it's still good, right?

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    You should get a vote for understanding the question. – RyeɃreḁd May 13 '14 at 22:32
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What's the worst that could happen?

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    This doesn't look an answer until one reads the OP's post. Could you please explain the reason for "What' the worst that could happen" instead of "nothing bad will happen" – Mari-Lou A Mar 13 '15 at 7:19

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