Aug
5
comment A verb for when some rights are not violated?
Although 'fairly' sometimes means 'with fairness; equitably' in this context I for one would read it as 'to some extent but not completely and thoroughly' which is not the meaning the OP wants. Moving it to 'civil rights are respected, fairly' avoids the misinterpretation but is clunky; I would probably just omit it. Or switch to a synonym like 'equitably' or 'equally'.
Jul
21
comment Is “repository” pronounced /rɪˈpɒzɪt(ə)ri/ or \ri-ˈpä-zə-ˌtȯr-ē\ or /rəˈpäzəˌtôrē/?
For the computer programming context (git svn etc) 'repository' is often truncated to 'repo' pronounced with long e and long o. (In US 'repo' is also used as the truncation of 'reposession',, when a lender seizes personal-property collateral on a loan which wasn't repaid as required, commonly an automobile. Apparently the set of people working on largish computer programs and the set who fail to repay loans don't overlap enough for this to cause problematic ambiguity.)
Jul
9
comment Having decision making power over someone's assets
'guardian' is good if ability to sell etc has been taken away at least temporarily from A and given to B, while A retains some benefits like possession and use, this is commonly used for a person legally judged incompetent (e.g. senile) or bankrupt (although 'trustee' is also common for bankrupt). If A still has the power but gives it to B in addition, I'd use 'agent'.although that's less specific
Jan
6
comment What do we call definitions we keep using for objects whose nature has changed?
And (unless pre-set) we stil 'dial' someone's (phone) number.
Jan
2
comment Word for “Significant enough to make a difference”
I don't know a formal standard to cite, but the wording of every accounting opinion I have read, on hundreds of financial statements, is that e.g. the statements opined on "... present fairly, in all material respects, XYZ company's consolidated balance sheet as of and results of operations for the years ended Dec. 31, 2017, 2016, and 2015" and also that internal control was judged adequate "to prevent, or detect and correct on a timely basis, any material misstatement".
2018
Nov
5
awarded  Critic
Nov
5
comment A word that means “the yield of a hunt”
'quarry' (and 'prey') includes everything a hunter or predator tries to catch whether or not they succeed. A human hunter's 'bag' is also used metonymically for the carcasses etc it contains, but I wouldn't use it for nonhumans.
Oct
5
comment Is there a word that means “measure time”?
For a program specifically on (any variant of) Unix, the standard command "time" shows "real" (elapsed) and "CPU" time of an execution. (These are actually measured by the operating system for all processes, but normally discarded; "time" preserves and shows them.)
Sep
5
answered What is the third option beside 'accept' and 'reject' on a ballot?
Jul
21
comment Do native speakers of major English varieties actually say “a software” or “softwares”?
@jaxad0127: The US fast-food chain Arby's has recently been advertising with the (ugly and annoying) slogan "We have the meats!"
May
31
comment “Can I” vs “May I” in restaurant setting when ordering
I've never heard and do not use 'I would have' -- but I do use 'I would like' or the contraction 'I'd like' (the implied conditional being 'I would like/enjoy eating it if/after you bring it) and 'I'll have' (usually contracted, only rarely 'I will have').
2017
Feb
25
comment What do you call a person who takes a survey?
For completeness, a person who performs the other kind of survey, namely measuring land to set legal boundaries, or before aerial photography to create accurate maps, is correctly called a 'surveyor'.
2016
Dec
21
comment More up-to-date alternative for “avoiding something like the plague”?
... Now we only need strategies for evading death :-)
Dec
21
comment More up-to-date alternative for “avoiding something like the plague”?
Nitpick: assuming you mean US states (as the name IRA for retirement savings implies) I believe all (certainly those I have lived in) do impose a 'use' tax equivalent to sales tax for things you bring back or have shipped from a no-tax state, or the difference from a lower-rate state. This is required be paid directly, rather than having the seller/merchant remit it, and states generally did not put much effort into enforcement except on costly items like fine art, but have increased in recent years apparently due to the growth of e-commerce versus 'brick-and-mortar'. Otherwise agree.
Dec
13
comment Is there any improper or awkward usage in this sentence?
The fact this is a visa 'invitation' changes it radically. Your goal is not to convince the consular officer your mother and you love each other -- they already assume that. The purpose of the immigration system is not to determine who loves whom, but to exclude people who may break the rules, especially by overstaying. I suggest you ask on travel.stackexchange.com (or expatriates if trying for a long stay), with the full sequence of events and if possible include images of the previous denials with personal details (names etc) redacted.
Dec
2
awarded  Teacher
Dec
2
answered Neutral to moderately offensive word for unimportant and uninteresting town
Sep
19
comment What do you call a child for whom you act as a guardian / custodian?
@Layna and Dick/Robin was even played by Burt Ward !
Aug
31
comment Synonym for vicious circle but less negative
Or similar but IMO very slightly stronger self-reinforcing.
Aug
19
comment What word can be used to describe 'not belonging to a country'?
@Matsmath: my thought also; and even better(?) in computer programming both 'stateless' and 'stateful' and the root 'state' are widely used with a quite different meaning, thus increasing the likelihood programmers will misunderstand this, causing mistakes and bugs