LifeInTheTrees
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What is the most common English term for a person who attempts a coup d'état?
21 votes

AN USURPER is an illegitimate or controversial claimant to power, often but not always in a monarchy. This may include a person who succeeds in establishing himself as a monarch without inheriting ...

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What are other ways to say I now understand or I have learned?
2 votes

I have ascertained, comprehended, demonstrated, assimilated, established, discovered, fathomed, verified.... some of these are not totally related to the concept of understanding... comprehending is ...

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What is the linguistic term to describe “–“ part of the phrase in “He ‘lied his a– off”?
1 votes

it's called a strike-through, a partial strikethrough or a censored text. it's a censored profanity or vulgarity, a crossed out word, text that has been filtered. It's an unofficial notation to depict ...

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The noun "floor" is countable, is it not?
1 votes

The plural form floors has been in use since at least three centuries, about as much as today considering the invention of skyscrapers: https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=floors&...

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Is it possible to start a grammatically-correct English sentence with the word "Than"?
1 votes

The answer to the question hinges in the definition of the word "phrase". A phrase can be any conceptual expression of some kind of clause, whether grammatically correct or not: A small group of ...

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The English translation for the Chinese word "剩女", meaning an unmarried girl over 27 without a boyfriend
0 votes

[ Sheng nu ](it's three words not one!) seems to be a joke rhyme of 剩余 [ shèng yú ], so if it were possible to find a rhyming chide, that would be a good translation. perhaps like a "debris dame&...

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Is there a word for the selective removal of items from a list (other than cull)?
0 votes

Shorten is a common term for a list because lists have length. decimate is used for very long lists.

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Formal alternative to bullsh-t
0 votes

Bullshit, formally, in a newspaper = "outrageous disinformation/fallacy/deception/untruth" ... The fact of it being a swear word adds emphasis, like outrageous, complete, etc. depending on context you ...

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"Awesome" vs. "Awful"
0 votes

Cheerful and cheersome would mean the same thing. So did an illogical process make awful/awesome antonyms? In old English, aue, eghe, ege, was "fear, terror, great reverence". From the Norse egi: ...

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Does anyone know where “crack down” comes from?
0 votes

Ngram viewer suggests it was first written as one word, in a book around 1898 to 1905

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Abbreviation in a business letter
0 votes

There's another page on the subject with some good information and suggestions, and a source stating that the abbreviation was not in widespread official use in that time. https://latin....

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"Subterranean", but for planets/surfaces other than Earth
0 votes

You can use creative liberty with the prefix sub. Subglacial, Subterranian, Subatmospheric, Subsurface, sub-lithospheric and underground, subaquatic, sub-benthic, sub-volcanic, sub-magmatic, ...

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How do you say "question de cours" in English?
0 votes

In my bilingual school for my european baccalaureate, and from experience being english and french, I believe that it's a "simple question" "question on the curriculum (content)" "part of the course" "...

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What is it called when you raise a problem and someone else makes it seem like you're entitled by bringing up something far worse?
-3 votes

Perhaps it's a Straw Man: The straw man fallacy occurs in the following pattern of argument: Person 1 asserts proposition X. Person 2 argues against a superficially similar proposition Y, falsely, as ...

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