Unreason
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To what do the "letters" in the title "a man of letters" refer?
1 votes

The way I consider the phrase 'man of letters' is the most basic meaning of letters, as building blocks of any kind of writing. Usingenglish.com, explains the idiom as A man of letters is someone ...

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Is "farewell reception" correct?
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The first meaning listed in macmillan for reception is a formal party to welcome someone or to celebrate something (Sense of "ceremonial gathering" is 1882, from French.) so a farewell reception ...

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How did English get the "What is your name?" construction?
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I wonder if it is really that different. After all, the name is that by which something or someone is called, and the two phrases have the same meaning. There are languages that follow one pattern ...

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What is meaning of "a long way from being"?
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This is in a sense of a long way from becoming, which means not at all.

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Is there any difference in meaning between these sentences?
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1 votes

If we start with C: Non-zero numbers cannot satisfy the condition. what you are asking is, I assume, if the following A: Positive and negative numbers cannot satisfy the condition. B: Positive or ...

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A technical problem here
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1 votes

The problem is not the fact that "technical problem" and "technicality" have different meanings, as you and others correctly notice that these meanings can overlap. The real problem here is that you ...

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Shortest comprehensive sentence in English
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Since you already have many sweet, and short, answers I can only speculate on your intentions and provide, possibly, interesting link to one word sentences.

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What is the origin of the phrase "turns out"?
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Etymonline does not mention exact phrase 'to turn out', but there is a short and simple entry for turn-out "audience, assemblage of persons who have come to see a show, spectacle, etc.",1816 ...

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What is a word for a question that has no answer because it is seemingly invalid?
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It could be enigma trick question unsolvable question

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"Seeing visions" versus "having visions"
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I think this is more a question of semantics, so the answer should come from examining the exact meanings of the words. If you look at dictionary entry for vision it lists something seen in a ...

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Word for situation in which there is no alternative
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You are not as clear as you could be, but I have a feeling that you are looking for the antonym of alternative. This is necessity. Necessity is neutral in the sense of reluctance (it is used for ...

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Origin of "good night"
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As @Peter Shor mentions, the pattern that is present in all languages seem to prefer the positive over comparative and superlative. Trying to explain why this is could be intereseting because it seems ...

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How to describe changing status of object
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Since the noun status is a state at particular time then making the verb out of it contradicts its own meaning. Also, status, as a state, is a collection of all or some properties of the object. ...

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Antonym of "insightful"
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The adjective insightful is defined as exhibiting insight or clear and deep perception Antonyms of this are: shortsighted or unperceptive, unperceiving (also the words others mentioned: ...

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Origin of "eye teeth"
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The etymology of eye teeth is obvious - due to their position below the eye. The etymology of the whole phrase give one's eye teeth - I would attribute this to the importance of the canines ...

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Is there a term for using a word twice in a row, but in a grammatically-appropriate way?
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EDITED You might call this a homonymic phrase (or compound). Since homonyms are words that sound the same (or are spelled the same) this might be a proper term do describe a phrase, or a part of a ...

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Meaning of "appeal" and "at the expense of reason"
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There are two lookups you should make 1) idiom at the expense of Fig. to the detriment of someone or something; to the harm of someone or something. He had a good laugh at the expense of his ...

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What is the grammatical term for the following idiom?
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Well the way I perceive the construct 'your + plural', where the plural is a plural of a unique noun is this is a metaphor; in your first example it refers to blue-chip stock, in second example it ...

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Is there a name for the type of noun is produced by adding the sufix 'ness' to an adjective?
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abstract nouns expressive of quality or state from plain text English dictionary -ness () A suffix used to form abstract nouns expressive of quality or state; as, goodness, greatness. You can ...

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Word with three consecutive L's
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I think that this search is quite a good proof that there are no such words that are common. Do note however that the above search is limiting it to common words, which for onelook means to be found ...

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Word for something that can be validated
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If you don't or can't use Nicholas' suggestion of validatable you might need to resort to a phrase To say that something is validatable, you could say that validity is verifiable.

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"At this time" vs "At that time"
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I found Keith's answer excellent (+1) and agree completely with it. What is left is to apply it to the given question. Now, I feel (as a non-native speaker) that it is possible to use "this" to ...

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What do you call someone who works on requests?
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In use case analysis a general term for "someone who does something in a process" is the actor.

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What does "bordered on narcoleptic" mean?
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But if an explanation is where the mind comes to rest, the mind that ... bordered on narcoleptic. This part says - if an explanation is where mind rests, the mind that ... reached no rest, i.e. did ...

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Difference between "chance" and "opportunity"
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Opportune has a very nice etymology: opportune c.1400, from L. opportunus "favorable," from the phrase ob portum veniens "coming toward a port," in reference to the wind, from ob "to, toward" + ...

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Is there a term for switching syllables of words?
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In an answer to the third part of your question, there is a list of figures that are related to the order. However, it is not so much playful as much as it is classical.

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The meaning of "This is it"
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The dictionaries actually have entries that explains this meaning World English Dictionary > 6) informal ( used as complement with be ) the crucial or ultimate point: the steering failed and I ...

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Suggestion for English phrase dictionary?
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From Idiom's external links at wikipedia article, the following American Idiomatic Expressions The phrase finder Dictionary of English Idioms & Idiomatic Expressions yielded some results for a ...

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Is "conversate" a word?
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Conversation is a common word, and the matching verb is to converse, not *conversate. Still, it is not used very much compared to synonyms.

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Word for sensors that collect the same data in two different ways
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Actually I would not disregard, according to WNWCD complementary, adjective acting as a complement; completing making up what is lacking in one another or CALD complementary ...

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