Unreason
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Dropping the subject from sentences
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9 votes

There is grammatical ellipsis, which in general case might not introduce the sense of accelerated time, but quite the reverse, depending on how hard is it to parse, for example: The average person ...

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Hex, curse, spell, jinx, charm
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9 votes

Here are the etymologies from most recent words to older (from etymonline.com). I recommend reading them as these words these days might have lost much of their delineation - today we label them under ...

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Word opposite of risk but still entailing uncertainty
9 votes

Opportunity is another one. Antonymous meaning is evident in phrases like: "risks and opportunities". Yourdictionary lists these synonyms for opportunity: chance, occasion, suitable circumstance, ...

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What is the meaning of this sentence: "He can can a can"?
9 votes

can is able to throw away container

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I cannot understand what's being asked here
9 votes

What are the ways in which the universal, inclusive conception of French nationalism was tested by a (racially-conceived) particularistic, exclusive one? This asks in which way (or ways) one side of ...

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"People like you" versus "people like yourself"?
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9 votes

You can find that yourself is yourself, pronoun 1 used when both the subject and object of the verb are you Be careful with that knife or you'll cut yourself! 2 used to give special attention to the ...

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Does a comparative always need to compare with something?
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8 votes

Sure, the name comparative does not proscribe the valency. It is just the form that is used when you are comparing two things. In cases when you have one thing it can still be used. Following cases ...

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Where did the expression "my two cents" come from?
8 votes

Wikipedia has only speculations that it is related to either or both of these sayings: I said a penny for your thoughts, but I got two pennies' worth If you don't put your two cents in, how can you ...

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Why does the name 'John' have an 'h' in it?
8 votes

From behindthename English form of Iohannes, the Latin form of the Greek name Ιωαννης (Ioannes), itself derived from the Hebrew name יוֹחָנָן (Yochanan) meaning "YAHWEH is gracious". This ...

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A word for someone who has more skill than a code monkey to be at just the next level
8 votes

In my opinion vartec's answer is good regarding the official classification. I will assume that you ask for informal or funny use. The code monkey is neologism, from jargon (and probably from tape ...

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History/Orgin of "troubleshoot"?
7 votes

Etymonline has it tracked to troubleshooter also trouble-shooter, 1898, originally one who works on telegraph or telephone lines. From trouble (n.) + shoot (v.).

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"fluctuates widely" or "wildly"?
7 votes

Exactly, they both make sense. And they are not the same so neither is 'more correct'. Some graph can fluctuate wildly over relatively narrow range of values while another can fluctuate widely in ...

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A word for when a word is used incorrectly (grammatically) but can still be parsed in a grammatically correct way?
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7 votes

There are a few names for (rhetoric) vices that refer to using wrong words or wrong expressions at wrong places. You are probably looking for acyrologia, An incorrect use of words, especially the ...

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"Mutexes" or "mutices"?
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7 votes

As you say mutex comes from mutual exclusion, which is, obviously, not Latin origin; emulating Latin etymology is therefore a case of introducing unnecessary complexity. EDIT(2): As noted in the ...

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Synonyms for "Almighty"
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7 votes

First of all some people question the existence of perfect synonyms: Some lexicographers claim that no synonyms have exactly the same meaning (in all contexts or social levels of language) because ...

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What is the origin of the phrase "caught red-handed"?
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7 votes

On etymonline you will find that it is, presumably, from the blood on hands. There are other more detailed articles around, quote: Red-handed doesn't have a mythical origin however - it is a ...

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Is the word "epic" being used correctly these days?
7 votes

From your own quote of the definition, you have heroic; majestic; impressively great: the epic events of the war. The question is what exactly is preventing you to apply the emphasized meanings ...

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Merging words into one. When is it allowed?
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6 votes

The compounding is one of the ways new words are formed, nothing mystical here. If you look at various English compounds and how they are formed you will notice that these are different compared to ...

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What is the plural of 'sorry'?
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6 votes

James Leigh in his "Sir Ralph Esher", 1832 wrote "Sorry me no sorrys, my Lord Duke," cried the Duchess (I have a feeling that this is slang employed literary, so it is not necessarily grammatical ...

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What would you call a person who is always confused?
6 votes

I think there is no big mystery here. True if you say You are confused. That implies transitional state, a state that has a specific duration. However, if you say You are easily confused. The ...

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Is there an antonym for the word "Behold"?
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6 votes

Behold is defined as to perceive through sight or apprehension to gaze upon however it is an old word, which uses these meaning specifically used in the imperative especially to call ...

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Use of "brother" in non-family and non-religious contexts
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6 votes

First of all, there are other meanings for the word brother outside the family context 2 : one related to another by common ties or interests 3 : a fellow member — used as a title for ministers ...

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Difference between "fluency" and "fluidity"
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6 votes

I will compare the adjectives fluent and fluid. The etymologies of the words are shared and so is one of the meanings: smooth and unconstrained in movement So, when you speak about movement (...

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Why we say "save file" and not "keep/preserve file"
6 votes

As always with etymologies of computer related terms I have turned to the jargon file. Now, though it does not have a mention of the term specifically, it does describe following (you can read only ...

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An experiment without a hypothesis?
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6 votes

This should be a comment, but it will run long. Here's what you note However I'm surprised that some of the answers have implied that there's something trivial, invalid or unscientific about ...

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Meaning of a quote in movie Casino Royale (2006)
6 votes

There are answers and then there are answers. This is, in wider sense, a ploce : The repetition of a single word for rhetorical emphasis. The term is from Gk. plekein, "to plait". Also sp. ploche, ...

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What to call certain types of vague words that trigger strong emotions
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6 votes

I present words and phrases separately as they influence the emotional charge that is delivered in different ways - words are building blocks, but they are perceived in the context of speech figures: ...

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Aeroplane and airplane
6 votes

Etymology online says 1907, from air (1) + plane; though the original references are British, the word caught on in Amer.Eng., where it largely superseded earlier aeroplane (1873, and still common ...

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Can you actually "stand to the right" on escalator?
6 votes

To the right is a phrase on its own and means on or towards the right. In this sense you can easily say stand to the right.

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What does “be at it” mean? Is it an idiom?
5 votes

As Barrie says "to be at it" essentially means "to be doing it". It is an idiom. The slight differences are that it is a little bit less explicit and I feel it can also be a good expression to say "...

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