Unreason
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How did the word "chunter" come about?
Accepted answer
2 votes

It seems to come from Yorkshire dialect, with direct meaning of mutter. Also, to me the connection with 'chant' looks interesting: chant (v.) late 14c., from O.Fr. chanter "to sing, ...

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What is the origin of being in "hot water"?
2 votes

All, I could find was: This idiom means to be in big trouble or be in an embarrassing situation with someone. It originated in the early 1500s. It may refer to when you're cooking and you spill hot ...

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Can 'area' be called 'plot'?
2 votes

If it could than a "plot area" would be pleonasm. Plot, in several meanings of the word, see here, can have an area.

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Word opposite of risk but still entailing uncertainty
9 votes

Opportunity is another one. Antonymous meaning is evident in phrases like: "risks and opportunities". Yourdictionary lists these synonyms for opportunity: chance, occasion, suitable circumstance, ...

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Where did 'love someone to the bones' come from?
3 votes

The meaning of this idiom is to the bone as completely as possible It can apply not only to love. To match that meaning with "love someone too much", you would have to use either specific ...

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Difference between "then" and "than"
2 votes

As others say, the semantics of these words is very different and others have clearly defined the meaning. All that is left for you is to memorize it. Here is, a bit of etymology: The adverb then ...

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Is "receival" a valid word for the act of receiving something?
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16 votes

If you check it with onelook you will find this noun mentioned in only two sources (which is really rare) and none of them is a major source. Searching through the books finds about 5,000 results ...

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Can a noun (such as “duct tape”) be used as a verb?
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18 votes

This is, I learn, called conversion in lingustics: also called zero derivation, is a kind of word formation; specifically, it is the creation of a word from an existing word without any change in ...

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Is there a difference between "holiday" and "vacation"?
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26 votes

Yes, while they can mean the same thing, vacation is, also, a time when one decides to have a holiday, while holiday is the time when one does not decide, but when it is decided on some higher level (...

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Do you say 'white blackboard'?
10 votes

That is, quite naturally, called whiteboard, Bierce does not have an entry for the word but it would probably be: the writing board that always get written on with permanent marker

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Why does the name 'John' have an 'h' in it?
8 votes

From behindthename English form of Iohannes, the Latin form of the Greek name Ιωαννης (Ioannes), itself derived from the Hebrew name יוֹחָנָן (Yochanan) meaning "YAHWEH is gracious". This ...

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"Forecasted" or "forecast"
3 votes

As editor? Of course not! However, in this case, according to dictionary.com verb, -cast or -cast·ed both forms are correct. So, it is a matter of style and it depends on guidelines you decide ...

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Difference between 'decline' and 'decrease'
3 votes

If you compare the overlapping meanings, you see that Decrease can mean: without object to diminish or lessen in extent, quantity, strength, power, etc.: During the ten-day march across the ...

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Is there a term for switching syllables of words?
0 votes

In an answer to the third part of your question, there is a list of figures that are related to the order. However, it is not so much playful as much as it is classical.

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If Christopher is a "carrier of Christ" then what is Jennifer carrying?
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28 votes

No Jennifer is from From a Cornish form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar (see GUINEVERE). This name has only been common outside of Cornwall since the beginning of the 20th century, after it was featured ...

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Fine semantic differences between "thus" and "therefore"
10 votes

From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition thus In this manner: Lay the pieces out thus.1 To a stated degree or extent; so. 2 Therefore; consequently: Thus3 it was ...

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A word for someone who has more skill than a code monkey to be at just the next level
8 votes

In my opinion vartec's answer is good regarding the official classification. I will assume that you ask for informal or funny use. The code monkey is neologism, from jargon (and probably from tape ...

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Word for someone who collects dice
12 votes

If you mean what is the word that has the same relation to game dice collection as philately to stamp collection? Then, I don't think there is already one (also note: while dictionaries define ...

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A data compromise
3 votes

Dictionary.com gives -verb 6) to expose or make vulnerable to danger, suspicion, scandal, etc.; jeopardize: a military oversight that compromised the nation's defenses. -noun 4) an endangering, ...

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The meaning of "This is it"
0 votes

The dictionaries actually have entries that explains this meaning World English Dictionary > 6) informal ( used as complement with be ) the crucial or ultimate point: the steering failed and I ...

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Does "Fail to understand" have a negative connotation?
1 votes

Was it possible at all to understand the article? Even if you stated that article was unclear, saying that XYZ failed to get it, in spoken language, implies failure, implies that there was an ...

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What is the meaning of this sentence: "He can can a can"?
9 votes

can is able to throw away container

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Can "Sure thing" mean "You're welcome"?
12 votes

Well neither of the things that are used as replies to "thank you" is particularly logical in the direct meaning of the words you're welcome: welcome originally means 1. gladly and cordially received:...

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The meaning of "This is it"
1 votes

It is actually quite simple This is it. "This", as in this that you perceive and you are aware of, "is it", where "it" is a third person pronoun, refers to some "it" that is already known to the ...

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What are the origins of the idiom "dying to..."?
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4 votes

I can only speculate, but this simple hyperbole was probably generated many times for the same reasons: I would die to meet you. => I am dying to meet you. as Jez mentions similar transformation ...

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Rhetorical device in Julius Caesar
1 votes

After searching a bit, I think I have a more specific term than Raven Epanalepsis from Gk. ep, "in addition", ana, "again," and lepsis, "a taking". It is also known as resumptio, the echo sound, the ...

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Identifying the literary technique
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2 votes

Under classic rhetoric I think this would be called correctio (L. “correction, amendment”) correctio The amending of a term or phrase just employed; or, a futher specifying of meaning, especially ...

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Terminology for the levels user programs go through to access hardware
3 votes

When describing system's architecture you can use: layers (OSI model) tiers (multitier architecture)

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Suggestion for English phrase dictionary?
0 votes

From Idiom's external links at wikipedia article, the following American Idiomatic Expressions The phrase finder Dictionary of English Idioms & Idiomatic Expressions yielded some results for a ...

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Is there a single noun, preferably not a gerund, for the act of exceeding or surpassing?
2 votes

According to quite a few dictionaries exceedance is a word. Here are some of the results of the search for its synonyms (not gerunds): excess overrun overshoot overhang overflow

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