Sep
2
comment Meaning of “educating the ice”
The metaphor makes sense in the other direction, e.g. "throwing someone in at the deep end". Except that he's reverse engineering the metaphor, using education to refer to submersion instead of the other way around. I don't think it's as bad as this answer suggests, but I do think you're mostly right about the character (or the author - my money's on the author tbh) trying to be semantically inventive.
Aug
29
comment Looking for a plural noun related to ‘fulcrum’ or ‘pivot’ that denotes multiple things as crucial to success
@Mazura: Every monarchy can only have one king too but that doesn't mean that "Robert Plant and Pete Townshend are the kings of rock" is somehow "pushing it". Figurative usage gets more leeway and does not need to completely conform to the origin of its reference.
Jul
16
comment Is it rude to refer to janitors as 'floor people'?
@Andrew: As a genuine response, "and floor professionals aren't people?"
Jul
16
comment Is it rude to refer to janitors as 'floor people'?
@HRIATEXP: The issue is more that you are inferring that it reveals how your manager views them. It only reveals how your manager refers to them, and that's meaningfully distinct. As a software developer, I make similar references to group of people such as "support people", "database people", ... and it wouldn't make sense for me to use their explicit title because who says that the group of people I'm referring to all have the exact same title? Whether you're a senior database architect or a junior database admin, you're both "database people" to non-database people.
Jul
11
comment Single word for “refusing to move to next activity unless present one is completed.”
@nasch: By semantical definition, I agree with your distinction. But considering its practical usage in reference to gamers, the distinction does not exist. "Completionist" is even used (loosely and not pedanctically correctly) for people who keep playing a game longer than the speaker would.
Jul
8
revised Having decision making power over someone's assets
added 1 character in body
Jul
8
answered Having decision making power over someone's assets
Jul
3
comment Why is there paternal, for fatherly, fraternal, for brotherly, but no similar word for sons?
@nigel222: Sonly does actually exist. But I do agree that's it's not really in common usage. According to the link, its usage has essentially tanked since the 1780s.
Jun
17
comment A word for delight at someone else's failure?
Note that sadism entails inflicting pain/humiliation to the target, it's not just a matter of seeing it. If you're not the one causing the pain/humiliation to someone, but it does amuse you, then schadenfreude/epicaricacy is more applicable.
Jun
17
answered Is it correct to use “Good Time” instead of “Good Morning” or “Good Night” etc?
Jun
13
comment Idiom for 'person who gets violent when drunk"
@K.A: ...which is still not violent, hence my point.
Jun
12
comment Idiom for 'person who gets violent when drunk"
@ShadowRanger: I consider making hurtful comments as a lack of manners. There's no real crime, it's just a matter of not being as nice as you could be. Especially if the hurtful statements are factually correct, I don't really see another way of describing it other than failing at etiquette/manners.
Jun
11
comment Idiom for 'person who gets violent when drunk"
Belligerent isn't necessarily violent (but it is the closest approximation to it that you can have without being violent). Belligerent people can also just try to instigate a fight but never become violent unless provoked (but of course it's equally possibly that they do resort to violence by themselves eventually)/
Jun
11
comment Idiom for 'person who gets violent when drunk"
Note that "mean" doesn't inherently state violence, but rather a lack of manners. People who get belligerent can also be described as being mean drunks, but they're not violent.
Jun
5
comment English word for “product of tinkering”
@Arthur: When you MacGyver something, It's be more apt (imo) to say that you created something from parts that you wouldn't expect to be used like that. Whether or not it's an actual fix to the solution is a different matter. If you create a flamethrower out of beans and a leather shoe, that's impressive MacGyvering. If you created it because you needed a haircut, that's... not a good solution, but you did still MacGyver a flamethrower.
May
23
comment What is the meaning of the term “town hottie”?
@JanusBahsJacquet Traits are usually a spectrum, not a binary state. It makes little sense for only one person to be considered attractive, in any size of community. Tastes differ and not everyone will agree on who is more attractive than who. But the town hottie is predominantly agreed to be predominantly the most attractive. The same applies to drunk/idiot. You can argue anyone who is drunk at one point to be a drunk. The town drunk isn't necessarily always drunk, but he is the person who is most often drunk, on the spectrum of alcohol drinkers. And similar for idiocy.
May
20
comment What is the meaning of the term “town hottie”?
@Lambie Are you a straight male? Not to imply anything, I (as a straight male) wouldn't use it either. But my wife does use it, and so does my gay male friend. Because it makes more sense for them to refer to men as "hot".
May
20
revised What is the meaning of the term “town hottie”?
added 87 characters in body
May
20
comment What is the meaning of the term “town hottie”?
@Lambie Counterpoint, with link to results for the male use case
May
20
revised What is the meaning of the term “town hottie”?
added 3 characters in body