2016
Aug
22
awarded  Constituent
Aug
8
awarded  Caucus
2015
Oct
24
comment “Who should be ashamed is your wife” is this ungrammatical? Why?
Ambiguity of interrogative vs. declarative would be a reason to avoid opening the sentence with a noun clause "Who...", but here the sentence opens with the prepositional phrase, "In your case...". It sounds okay to my ear with this "clue", and in a technical sense anyway avoids being ungrammatical.
Sep
13
comment What's the verb that describes “the act of using your hand to illustrate your words”?
Gesticulate is a good response for the question's title, but imitating would be fine for the context described in the body.
Sep
3
comment “dedicated to helping people ” or “dedicated to help people”
The first version has a more natural "sound" to it (although both are wordy as written descriptions).
Aug
6
awarded  Yearling
Jul
12
awarded  Custodian
Jul
12
awarded  Custodian
Jun
17
comment Resulted in “him” or “his” losing the job?
It's certainly grammatical to use him here, and possibly preferable in conveying that losing the job happened to him rather than being an outcome that was effected by him. That said, if your supervisor is willing to let it go, take it silently as a win for your point of view.
May
7
awarded  Quorum
Mar
10
comment Stronger word for “selfish”
Selfishness has connotations of both greed and pride (egotism), so if one wished to maintain that blend of meanings, using the modifying adverb is a good approach.
Mar
10
comment Stronger word for “selfish”
@JonMarkPerry: altruistic
Mar
2
comment Using “shy” as a verb?
I shy away from correcting Merriam-Webster, but I would say it means to avoid (or retreat from) something. Especially used to describe the behavior of animals, such as horses, where a notion of dislike or fear is necessarily an interpretation of an overt behavior.
Jan
31
comment What is the noun of 'to forsake'?
The gerund form of verbs, here "forsaking", can well be used as a noun. Do you specifically want to avoid this?
2014
Oct
11
answered Which part of speech has the fewest words?
Sep
19
comment Can you use “little” to modify an adjective?
The adverb scarcely would serve in many contexts where you want to convey "not enough" of an attribute.
Sep
19
comment Can you use “little” to modify an adjective?
As hinted at in the last paragraph, the adverb slightly will be serviceable to modify adjectives in many contexts.
Jul
23
answered More emphatic term for “Expert”?
Jul
20
comment What's the word for a tiny sharp piece of wood under your skin?
A splint is apt to be understand as some rigid item used to stabilize a broken or severly sprained limb. A finger split might be used in the case of an injured finger, for example.
Jun
24
comment Is the phrase “I love playing guitar, been doing it since a very young age” grammatically correct?
It's an elliptical construction, meaning that a word or phrase easily filled in by the Reader or Listener is omitted.