BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft
Aug
22
comment Is “I am getting married with my sister” ambiguous?
To me, "married with" sounds like an antiquated but usable way to say "married to": "You are to be married with the Prince on the day you become of age, and that is final!"
May
10
comment Names of the Six Tastes
If OP is a non-native speaker looking for a word that most native speakers would use, I don't think either "astringent" or "tannic" work (I've never heard of either of these). "Umami" is well-known, but still rarely used (I've mostly heard it in scientific contexts, or sometimes at Japanese restaurants). However "savory" is a word that a native speaker would use readily.
Mar
21
comment Is this toilet sign correct usage of the English language?
Seems like a better question for ell.stackexchange.com
Feb
19
comment “Cheaper by the dozen” phrase origin?
I'm not disagreeing with any "facts from the answer", I'm just stating that none of it seems to be related to the question. The question is not about the etymology of "motherfucker", "butt busting", or "honky". "A cheap dozen" or "the dozens" could potentially be related to "cheaper by the dozen", but you haven't provided any evidence of that (and based on other answers, it seems likely they aren't). The downvotes are not because of some site-wide political agenda conspiracy, they're because this does not answer the question.
Jan
10
comment A single word synonym for “A person not to mess with”
You can also find a few more common, similar words that haven't been mentioned yet in a thesaurus entry
2018
Oct
7
answered What's a concise word for “difficult to explain”
Jun
20
awarded  Scholar
Jun
20
accepted Is “more optimal” correct grammar?
Apr
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
29
comment What part of speech is ‘mountains’ in the sentence “I like climbing mountains”?
@tchrist According to, uh, you, a gerund is both a verb and a noun.
Jan
10
comment If someone calls something by a wrong name, what are they actually referring to?
Peanuts are not nuts, but that does not mean "peanut" is the wrong word to use to describe a peanut.
2017
Jul
20
comment What is the opposite of a “false positive”?
Why is "true negative" below "false positive" in that image? That makes no sense.
Jul
17
comment Is “recent past” an oxymoron?
Why does this have so many upvotes? 'recent' and 'past' are not even opposites.
May
9
comment Is there an idiom for “People very quickly get used to good things”
"Don't know what you've got 'til it's gone"
May
8
comment Is there an idiom for “People very quickly get used to good things”
This seems to be about people wanting more and more, not necessarily getting used to what they have
Apr
23
comment The meaning of a short excerpt of dialog from the “La-La Land” movie
Seems like this would fit better on ell.stackexchange.com
Mar
23
awarded  Yearling
Mar
23
revised What is the meaning of the idiom “cat's in the cradle”?
deleted 132 characters in body
Mar
23
comment What is the meaning of the idiom “cat's in the cradle”?
How are the fairy tales referenced in the song are relevant? The question is asking what "Cat's in the Cradle" refers to in popular culture. In my experience that has always been a reference to the song itself, not the fairy tales in the song.
Mar
23
answered What is the meaning of the idiom “cat's in the cradle”?