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6 answers
12 votes
20k views
The etymology of "to prove dough"
1 votes

Update: There is an earlier date found for the origin of prove (as a baking term) in Google Books and it is in Sven Yarg's answer. I'm including the earliest citation from OED (from the book ...

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8 answers
18 votes
9k views
What is the English equivalent of the Persian word "Saghi" (ساقی)?
3 votes

The generally accepted loan word in English for this term is saki or saqi. Obviously, this is a special word which is usually used in literature or technical contexts. If you want a more common term ...

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6 answers
5 votes
10k views
What is the idiom for "as anyone can see" or "clearly"?
4 votes

clear as day (or plain as day) to be obvious or easy to see She's in love with him - it's as plain as day. And some other contenders: as plain as the nose on your face as plain as a pikestaff ...

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2 answers
3 votes
390 views
Classification of culinary related item called?
0 votes

I think the umbrella term that would cover all classifications of culinary items is food preparation. For example wikipedia outlines the following sub-classifications under food preparation: ...

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7 answers
4 votes
62k views
What is a word for having a lot of life experience or a person with a lot of life experience?
5 votes

worldly-wise (or world-wise) Prepared by experience for life’s difficulties; not easily shocked or deceived Lisa was sufficiently worldly-wise to understand the situation or worldly Experienced in ...

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10 answers
23 votes
15k views
What is it called when something you previously took to be a mistake turned out to be the correct decision?
14 votes

You can consider these phrases that are directly related to mistakes with good outcomes: lucky mistake fortunate error happy fault There is also a Latin phrase (used in English), felix culpa, which ...

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3 answers
2 votes
498 views
Does not show one's potential
2 votes

The adjective unfulfilled might be used to describe this kind of person. of persons; marked by failure to realize full potentialities; "unfulfilled and uneasy men" Source: http://www....

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7 answers
4 votes
781 views
Word for relative movement of inner and outer
1 votes

I think we can call it "inner sliding motion" if we assume that there is a friction. Sliding is a type of frictional motion between two surfaces in contact. This can be contrasted to rolling motion....

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4 answers
16 votes
117k views
What is the difference between "illness" and "disease"?
Accepted answer
17 votes

The following diagram is from the University of Ottawa, "Society, the Individual, and Medicine (SIM) curriculum" notes. The diagram illustrates the difference between illness, disease, and sickness, ...

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8 answers
3 votes
3k views
A word meaning <a short article or essay>
2 votes

You can consider these terms: Prolusion — A literary essay or article intended as a precursor to a fuller treatment of a subject. [OED] - From Latin Precede — Brief editorial preface (usually to an ...

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15 answers
10 votes
4k views
"He is an opportunist, there's no need to give him more excuses or opportunities!"
Accepted answer
2 votes

I believe the idiom have an eye to/for the main chance comes close. It is more of a British idiom. Someone who has an eye to/for the main chance is always ready to use a situation to their own ...

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7 answers
6 votes
730 views
A word that means that a germ or disease can affect a species
6 votes

You might be thinking of susceptible and it is a term used in virology also. with of or to: Capable of being physically affected by; esp. liable to take, subject to (a disease or other affection). ...

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3 answers
1 votes
711 views
Word to describe something of something of something
1 votes

It is called recursion. Recursion is the process of repeating items in a self-similar way. For instance, when the surfaces of two mirrors are exactly parallel with each other, the nested images that ...

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7 answers
3 votes
10k views
Seeking single word denoting a word pair in which one cannot exist without the other
1 votes

I think you are looking for binary opposition. A binary opposition (also binary system) is a pair of related terms or concepts that are opposite in meaning. Binary opposition is the system by which, ...

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20 answers
26 votes
101k views
What do you call a person that goes to extreme ends to accomplish a goal?
0 votes

The person is desperate. Of persons: Driven to desperation, reckless or infuriated from despair. Hence, Having the character of one in this condition; extremely reckless or violent, ready to run ...

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4 answers
4 votes
1k views
What's the word or phrase to describe this behaviour?
Accepted answer
3 votes

In psychology, it is called hindsight bias. (also known as knew-it-all-along effect or creeping determinism). The hindsight bias is defined as a tendency to change a recollection from an original ...

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7 answers
12 votes
104k views
What expression to use when a wave hits the beach and fades away?
21 votes

After the wave breaks, it is called swash. Swash, in geography, is known as a turbulent layer of water that washes up on the beach after an incoming wave has broken. Swash consists of two phases: ...

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3 answers
6 votes
2k views
A word meaning "able to be muted"
Accepted answer
6 votes

It is muteable. It is an uncommon word and not listed in credible dictionaries but it is in Wiktionary: Capable of being muted.

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3 answers
4 votes
864 views
What term describes the feeling of routine sacrifice or loss of opportunity due to a conflicting obligation?
Accepted answer
2 votes

I believe you are looking for self-abnegation or abnegation. self-abnegation: the denial of one's own interests in favour of the interests of others Collins Here are some more details and an ...

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9 answers
3 votes
2k views
Idiom for analysing something from a strange perspective
1 votes

Thinking off-the-wall might suggest the oddity you want. If you think off-the-wall, it is quite similar to a burrito. off-the-wall: strange, often in a funny or interesting way [MacMillan]

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2 answers
2 votes
19k views
English equivalent of tsundere
2 votes

The related idioms for "gradually showing a warm and caring side over time" are: warm (up) to somebody: to start to like someone: I wasn't sure about Sarah at first, but I warmed to her ...

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1 answers
2 votes
193 views
On the origin of "exit poll"
1 votes

OED confirms that it is first used in 1980: Exit polls showed Reagan picking up as many Democratic crossover votes as Anderson was. 1980, Washington Post 2 Apr. a12 Google Ngram gives false positive ...

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10 answers
4 votes
23k views
What to call the large containers of bottled water?
11 votes

I think you are looking for a carboy or a demijohn. They are usually made of glass but they can be plastic also. For commercial use, they usually contain distilled water and they can be used in ...

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10 answers
12 votes
19k views
Polite, non-profane equivalent to ‘kick a**’
0 votes

I would suggest beat as a non-profane, easy-to-understand, single-word alternative for your context. There is also the phrasal verb beat up but it is used in literal sense mainly and things get ...

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4 answers
1 votes
12k views
Is there a word that describes people capable of picking up an accent by hearing?
Accepted answer
2 votes

Technically, it is called speech imitation ability. The person who has this ability is called a good mimic also. Speech sound imitation is a pivotal learning mechanism for humans. Vocal imitation ...

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3 answers
5 votes
8k views
Etymology of "dutchman" to mean a carpentry patch?
Accepted answer
5 votes

The book Torching the Fink Books and Other Essays on Vernacular Culture (by Archie Green) offers seven pages on the origin of dutchman. In summary, the most plausible theory suggests that dutchman was ...

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21 answers
30 votes
13k views
Is there a single word for when something becomes neglected or forgotten (e.g. a plant dies because the gardener forgets to water it)?
-1 votes

I don't think there is a single word that captures "died from neglect". Most of the answers till now capture the "neglected" part but not "died from neglect". Wither came ...

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22 answers
22 votes
31k views
An old car in bad condition
6 votes

Flivver comes to mind also beside modern slang terms. The use of jalopy superseded flivver over time but flivver has this nostalgic feel. A flivver is an American slang term used during the early ...

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2 answers
3 votes
739 views
"Jiggery-pokery" - Can Anyone Remedy this Paucity?
2 votes

OED gives the Scottish joukery-pawkery n. (clever trickery, jugglery, legerdemain) as the ultimate origin and the first usage is from 1686: Deil fetcht was it but Jewkrypawkry. G. Stuart Joco-...

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2 answers
18 votes
78k views
Why is the plural of "aircraft" not "aircrafts"?
Accepted answer
13 votes

It is because craft is a collective term and OED mentions that it might be originated as an elliptical expression. Craft itself is used as aircraft as well. OED includes the following explanation for ...

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