rogermue
  • Member for 8 years
  • Last seen more than 5 years ago
  • Munich, Germany
3 answers
58 votes
20k views
6 bookmarks
Etymology of "a pride of lions"
12 answers
20 votes
21k views
Idiom: in my neck of the woods, AmE
5 answers
10 votes
2k views
3 bookmarks
progressive forms: participle or gerund?
3 answers
6 votes
7k views
4 bookmarks
Why do people use ‘should’ in “It’s funny you should say that”?
4 answers
6 votes
18k views
Idiom: to be at loggerheads
1 answers
6 votes
2k views
2 bookmarks
Supine - what is supine in English grammar?
2 answers
6 votes
1k views
What sentence part is "visitors" in "I'm not allowed visitors"?
2 answers
5 votes
921 views
Etymology: predicament
2 answers
5 votes
612 views
1 bookmarks
Unclear verb structure: to have her help with the homework
2 answers
5 votes
707 views
Etymology of orchard
5 answers
4 votes
13k views
Idiom: to be off the wall
4 answers
4 votes
2k views
2 bookmarks
"You 're telling me" - What kind of expression is this?
3 answers
3 votes
572 views
Indirect speech, tense shift in clauses of second degree
1 answers
3 votes
1k views
3 bookmarks
Overuse of progressive forms
5 answers
2 votes
4k views
Idiom: Bear with me
2 answers
2 votes
310 views
1 bookmarks
Etymology: of unknown origin
2 answers
2 votes
973 views
1 bookmarks
Etymology: bedraggled
3 answers
2 votes
608 views
etymology: to get rid of
1 answers
2 votes
2k views
early on, later on - How to explain "on"?
1 answers
1 votes
270 views
Uncertain grammar areas
1 answers
1 votes
8k views
I would do / I would have done - What are the grammar terms of this tense/mood?
1 answers
1 votes
152 views
1 bookmarks
How did the preposition "by" evolve its sense of "length x [by] width"?
3 answers
1 votes
615 views
Etymology: the wings of a bird
1 answers
0 votes
166 views
Etymology: to till the land
0 answers
0 votes
62 views
1 bookmarks
Gerunds - Should they be a word class of their own?
2 answers
0 votes
1k views
Irregular verbs: differences between BrE and AmE
3 answers
0 votes
1k views
Grammar knowledge - cause for low knowledge
2 answers
-1 votes
1k views
1 bookmarks
"dick all" meaning nothing, AmE, slang