Pete Wilson
  • Member for 10 years, 10 months
  • Last seen more than 9 years ago
Is there a word for "one who salvages"?
11 votes

The word in maritime law is salvor

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An ambiguity problem with "the first thing you remember"
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10 votes

To me, they are different. "What's the first thing you remember?" always means "what's your earliest memory?" never "what are you thinking right now?" This is so because present thought is not memory, ...

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What's the more appropriate substitution for "give a f**k/d**n/s**t"
8 votes

"I couldn't care less," perhaps?

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What is a term for the "first" meaning of a word?
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8 votes

is it "principal definition" or "first definition" or "main definition?" "

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"convey" vs. "say"
7 votes

Perhaps you don't "explain" it well.

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"Scientific" versus "scientifical"
5 votes

There is no such English word as "scientifical." You might make an argument that "acoustic" has the same meaning as "acoustical," though. Ain't English great?

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Can "intrude" be used transitively?
4 votes

"Intrude" is an intransitive verb so needs the preposition following. I've never seen "intrude" used with any preposition other than "on" but that is a stylistic matter, I think. "Invade" is ...

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Antonym of "distributed" as in "distributed system"
4 votes

Or perhaps an appropriate word is "localized."

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Correct naming form (with or without "of")
4 votes

Of software, one would say: System for topological analysis, if describing the package as a whole as in "Groundswell: The system for topological analysis." System of topological analysis, if ...

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What's a good word for a "line of ink spread sideways"?
4 votes

Do you mean an accidental smear? Or perhaps a calligraphic thick stroke?

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Is it true that iambic pentameter is "natural" to English? If so, why?
4 votes

Great question! Yes, many claim that the best prose that scans as iambic. I question the "pentameter" part, though: to me, most of the best English prose is in tetrameter.

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How is "e.g." pluralized?
3 votes

It says here in this book: Latin second declension neuter: exemplum singular; and exempla plural: example, sample, or model. And the neuter singular adjective gratum, plural grata: pleasing, grateful....

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Is the following sentence grammatically correct? It doesn't sound right
3 votes

You can resolve two difficulties by rephrasing: Not: "a total of 315 questionnaires was received." But "We received a total of 315 questionnaires." Gets rid of the awkward wording plus it gets ...

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Can I use two prepositions in this example, or is one better?
3 votes

First, what do we mean by "outlook?" Prediction? Opinion? Emotion? The word tells us very little. Better to use a word that's not so lazy, not so weasely. Also "reality": why not just say or show the ...

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"Biweekly", "bimonthly", "biannual", and "bicentennial"
2 votes

biweekly = every two weeks bimonthly = every two months biennially = every two years semiweekly = twice a week semimonthly = twice a month semiannually = biannually = twice a year

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Are “Pick up your socks” and “Have your socks bronzed” popular expressions as the antithesis?
2 votes

At bottom, Barry, you're just a normal human and husband. You're no god. So behave as a human: pick up your own socks off the bedroom floor. Don't expect me to do it for you. And bring me a beer. ...

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Are there other idioms like "a stone's throw away" that both describe an activity and act as a measurement?
2 votes

In Rhode Island, we say: Q: "How far is Providence?" A: "Oh, maybe a half-hour," meaning a trip by car lasting thirty minutes.

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Is “Am I needing to. . . ?” grammatical?
2 votes

It certainly is correct and, these days, not all that unusual. To my ear, it carries a plaintive connotation: "Do I really need to read that book?"

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Is there a term for a flaw in logic?
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2 votes

Depends on the point of view, doesn't it? When someone finds a logic error in my code, I call it "a small misunderstanding" and blame it on marketing's requirements doc. When I find a logic error in ...

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"...must have taken ‘after’ his daddy."
2 votes

"After" in this usage is incomplete and meaningless by itself. The verb phrase is "to take after" and it means "to resemble" in myriad ways: sense of humor, taxicab ears (like the ones I have), ...

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Is 'equivocate' a euphemism for 'lie' or can it not be about lying?
2 votes

"Prevaricate" must be the word you remember. It means "to lie." "Equivocate" is to express indecision, I believe. Well, maybe not. Maybe "equivocation" is to argue ("voc") both sides of a question ...

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Purchase price/cost/worth/value/… — which one?
2 votes

Perhaps 'price' is the term you are looking for in this seller-oriented table view, but the other terms seem even more interesting from the seller's and the buyer's POV (POVs? P'sOV? PsOV?). Just to ...

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Is there a word for a person who doesn't think the rules apply to him?
2 votes

Insensitive? Insensible? Callous, as in "callous disregard"?

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Synonym needed for "teetotaler"
1 votes

A teetotaler (originally tea-totaler, as I understand) doesn't necessarily advocate abstinence. The word means that he practices abstinence, that he himself abstains.

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What does “them” refer to here?
1 votes

The pronoun (according to my high-school English teacher) refers to the nearest preceding noun, so it refers to "conclusions" in your sentence. But that doesn't make sense. It is confusing, however ...

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"You could do worse than [x]"
1 votes

Another example of litotes is the cliché you've seen many times: "x is no small thing!" as in "to move the earth, no matter the lever, is no small thing."

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Usage of comma before quotes
1 votes

In the classical English grammar we were early taught in school, example b is correct. In current usage, I believe either is acceptable. In my writing, I've begun consciously to drop that comma.

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Which one to state — "We would like to thank You" or "We thank You"
1 votes

When I read/hear "we would like to ..." I think: please go right ahead! I'm waiting! "We would like to ..." seems to be yet another phrase we use to avoid getting to the point. Please just say, "...

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Word to describe both adding and removing but not updating
1 votes

When you are adding, removing, and altering objects in a list, are you not "editing" that list?

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What is a good word for "unable to be usefully applied"?
1 votes

I'd say the water advice is "useless" and the practice of drinking water to lose weight I'd call "futile."

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