ApproachingDarknessFish
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Grammatically correct sentence where "you're" and "your" can be interchanged?
41 votes

Forgive me if there's some subtlety of grammar that I've missed, but I believe the following sentence works: I know your fine. I am aware of the amount of money that you have been fined. ...

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Euphemism for diarrhea
16 votes

I recommend the phrase "Gastrointestinal distress." It's relatively formal (appropriate for a work setting), and avoids the messy details, but makes it very clear exactly which organ system is ...

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Opposite of "literal"
12 votes

"Figurative", "Metaphorical", and "Proverbial" all spring to mind. Figurative language is a general term describing anything in language that has a meaning other than its literal meaning--this is ...

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Phrase to describe person who seeks 100% achievements in game
4 votes

In addition to the previously mentioned "Achievement whore", another slightly less vulgar term (but still normally considered negative or derogatory) would be or "Achievement Farmer" (my personal ...

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Better word for 'believe' or 'think'
3 votes

Your analyst had the right idea but the wrong solution. "Think" may imply a more rational approach, but it is no better than "believe" in terms of implying an empirical (evidence-based) approach. If ...

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"Dedicated", "intended", or something else in "tomorrow is dedicated for the registration"
Accepted answer
3 votes

Of the two sentences you have provided, neither works very well, as they both describe tomorrow in the present tense. The best would probably be to say : "Tomorrow will be dedicated to the ...

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Sound something makes while travelling through a liquid
Accepted answer
2 votes

After much though and inspired by the discussion on this page, the best word that I was able to find was "slosh".

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Is there any curse/ swear equivalent for this Persian curse? " May your head be covered by soil!"
1 votes

It's not modern English, but if you're feeling decidedly overdramatic, the classic Shakespearean insult Infirm of Purpose is the only thing that sprung to mind for me. This expression comes from ...

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Is this the right way to use "wouldn't"?
1 votes

"Would not you want an extra layer of protection during this very confusing time?" I don't know whether or not this is technically correct, but you will never find it in modern English. It sounds ...

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A word of sudden and shocking realization
0 votes

Disclaimer: I've never encountered this word used before so I may be misinterpreting its usage. However, based on some quick research, it seems perfect for what you're describing. Epiphany was my ...

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