Andrew Ng
  • Member for 8 years, 4 months
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12 answers
25 votes
14k views
Idiom for magic object (or idea) that fixes everything
19 votes

This isn't a phrase, but there is the word panacea which the Oxford Dictionaries define as "a solution or remedy for all difficulties or diseases".

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10 answers
4 votes
5k views
What is a term for the hierarchical relationship between parent and child configuration options in software?
Accepted answer
14 votes

The nomenclature of a "parent" and a "child" implies that what affects the parent will influence the entirety of the children. Therefore, I would suggest eliminating any clarification. "Enabling or ...

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3 answers
8 votes
2k views
What is a "blow-off answer"?
11 votes

In such contexts , "blow-off" is used in a dismissive sense. For example, the phrase "blowing someone off" is to not meet someone who expected to see you, or to skip an appointment. By supplying a ...

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4 answers
6 votes
114k views
Meaning/origin of "You bet" as a response to "Thank you"
10 votes

The phrase "you bet" is the equivalent of saying "that's for sure." Essentially, the speaker is replying in the affirmative. The extension of the idiom to the context of a radio show can be ...

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2 answers
6 votes
24k views
Exact meaning of "Tyranny of Distance"
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7 votes

I'm not from Australia myself, but I believe the phrase "Tyranny of Distance" is used to emphasize the effect of geographical remoteness on shaping the country's identity. In particular, its distance ...

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1 answers
5 votes
121k views
How do I respond to "family emergency"?
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7 votes

In English-speaking culture, I often hear people apologize for the misfortune of the other person. It's common to say something like "I'm sorry to hear that. I hope everything is ok."

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3 answers
4 votes
7k views
Is it correct to use "branch" to describe type of industry?
6 votes

In American English, the term "branch" is used used in the corporate environment to describe the department of a company. You can have the Finance branch or the Development branch. I've also heard it ...

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2 answers
6 votes
2k views
What's the difference between "you" and "one" in the indefinite?
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6 votes

It's generally regarded that the two are grammatically acceptable pronouns in American English. However, "one" is also considered to be more formal than you and excessive use of the word can lead one ...

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4 answers
11 votes
8k views
Etymology of “byte”
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5 votes

The term byte implies a chunk of something — whenever I hear the word, I picture someone taking bite out of a sandwich. That chunk of sandwich is equivalent to the unit of digital information ...

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2 answers
3 votes
825 views
"Disjoint toolsets" vs. "disjointed toolsets"
Accepted answer
4 votes

"Disjointed" is indeed the main adjective form of "disjoint," but mathematics is a special case. When outside the academic field, "disjointed" is used to describe something that is separated at the ...

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3 answers
3 votes
15k views
The most natural way of asking for telephone call redirection
4 votes

There are certainly many ways to do this. I would suggest saying it one of two ways: Hello, could you please transfer me to room 321? or the slightly more informal Room 321, please.

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4 answers
6 votes
906 views
Dispensing or dosing?
4 votes

As the device outputs a viscous liquid, "dispense" seems to be an accurate term. The product can be compared to a soap dispenser. Therefore, I would suggest calling the product a -type of viscous ...

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2 answers
0 votes
809 views
How to differentiate between checked and selected items in a list
4 votes

The terminology I would use would be checked (or marked) and highlighted. The checkbox is checked and the row next to it can be highlighted. Both of these terms can serve as a noun and a verb.

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1 answers
0 votes
70 views
Modified version of an object, use of articles
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3 votes

The usage of "the" as opposed to "a" is dependent on the ambiguity surrounding the modified object. Is it a version which has already been defined? If so, "the" is correct. If not, "a" is correct. ...

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1 answers
1 votes
415 views
Paraphrase request
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3 votes

I assume you're referencing the state of an object's natural buoyancy in water. In this case, it may make more sense to say "near hydraulic equilibrium" as hydraulic equilibrium is a phrase that loses ...

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2 answers
1 votes
53k views
The difference between Cool and Cold
3 votes

I would say that they have rather different meanings. When I imagine "cold," I think that it's near freezing. However, "cool" implies a more pleasant atmosphere. This answer is coming from an American ...

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3 answers
1 votes
96 views
How should pluralised inline code be highlighted?
3 votes

I would use Three <section> elements. The reason why I would reject the first one is because the tag itself is <section>, not <sections>. Additionally, the second option can be ...

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1 answers
-1 votes
65 views
What's the meaning of "progressive additions"
3 votes

In the context of the sentence, "progressive addition" means for every additional 2 grams of the acid that was added. The first addition of 2 grams of acid resulted in a reduction of the pH by 0.34, ...

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4 answers
3 votes
345 views
"You'll feel better 'by and by'"
3 votes

I would be inclined to say that "by-and-by" would be more commonly used in your second case. As a reference, consider the hymn "In the Sweet By-and-By." One of the composers, Sanford Bennett, ...

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1 answers
2 votes
75k views
"Is it right?" or "Is it correct?"
Accepted answer
2 votes

Right can be used more often than correct. Correct implies something is absolutely true. Right can be used in matters of opinion. edit for referencing Let's consider the math problem 2+2. We can use ...

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2 answers
0 votes
203 views
Comma after or before "parenthetic" and?
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2 votes

It may be preferable to eliminate the comma and instead insert a period. The first sentence seems like a separate event from the second sentence. After showing me the house, Nana led us to the ...

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3 answers
1 votes
2k views
Can “take fruit in” something mean you enjoy it?
2 votes

I don't believe that this is a common idiom. One can take pleasure in one's life, but one cannot take fruit. A more common use of fruit is in the word "fruitful" - finding something fruitful is to ...

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2 answers
0 votes
642 views
Poison coursing through one's veins
Accepted answer
2 votes

The definition of course is consistent with that of coursing. The present participle form is defined by Merriam-Webster as "the act of one that courses." Course is defined as the act of moving in a ...

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2 answers
2 votes
647 views
Present Perfect or Past Simple to express duration in the past?
2 votes

Have you ever is usually used to reference an indefinite time in the past. Did you ever implies a more specific time. For example: Have you ever played chess? Did you ever finish playing that game of ...

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1 answers
3 votes
180 views
"I look for a place where I be free" — subjunctive or just bad English?
2 votes

"Where I be" can be used in conjunction with an auxiliary verb. I would suggest never using the phrase on its lonesome as "be" should be replaced with "am." Instead, inserting "would," "should," or "...

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1 answers
5 votes
22k views
What does "good job" mean?
Accepted answer
2 votes

The phrase is commonly spoken to one who has done something worthy of praise. For example, if a sales representative brings in $10 million on a deal, his boss may tell him that he did a "good job." In ...

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3 answers
2 votes
9k views
Single word for "trust breaker"?
Accepted answer
1 votes

The words "turncoat" and "deceiver" can be used to mean "trust breaker," but both have a connotation of betrayal.

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2 answers
-2 votes
301 views
Usage of the word "commuted"?
1 votes

The word commute can be used as both a noun and a verb. I'll write out a few sentences using the word and explain its definition in each case. The death sentence was commuted to life imprisonment. ...

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3 answers
1 votes
209 views
To "Please" or "not to Please"
1 votes

I suggest not using “Please” if your form comprises multiple steps. For example, it would be a bit awkward if your order process looked like this: Please select a menu language Please select an ...

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2 answers
0 votes
1k views
Is this grammar structure "is at its level" correct?
0 votes

In the context of the sentence, "level" is used to describe the amount of confidence in the British economy. A statement you may be more familiar with is "a high level of confidence in his technical ...

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